Category Archives: Uncategorized

Dallas, TX—November 2, 2020—

Responding to the continued public health crisis of opioid addiction in the US, Behavioral Health Group (BHG), the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the US, today announced their expanding footprint and service lines with the acquisition of Wellness Ambulatory Care in Knoxville, TN. The business employing 16 clinicians, counselors, and staff will become known as BHG Medical Services — Knoxville.

This move creates two significant opportunities to expand services across the state of Tennessee. First, it improves access to care for patients with opioid use disorder, offering choice in treatment modalities to best fit the needs of each patient. Second, it brings to BHG an enhanced range of mental health services through general psychiatric services for patients diagnosed with anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and other mental health disorders. BHG is committed to providing the full continuum of care for substance use disorders generally and the merger with Wellness Ambulatory Care provides the clinical model of the future.

In Tennessee, the need is pressing. “In a 2018 study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, the state of Tennessee ranked 11th in states reporting past year opioid use disorder. That means some 56,000 Tennesseans were already aware that they had OUD, and another 120,000 adults reported needing but not receiving treatment for illicit drug use that same year,” explained Jay Higham, BHG Chief Executive Officer. “This is a growing epidemic and we need to act decisively to save our communities.

To be effective long term, treatment must address the individual’s substance use disorder and any associated medical, mental health, social, vocational, and legal problems. Medication-assisted treatment (MAT), the gold standard of care for opioid use disorder, utilizes FDA-approved medications combined with a full modality of behavioral health counseling and other support services for a comprehensive treatment approach to addiction and co-occurring mental health conditions.

Wellness Ambulatory Care compliments BHG in both staffing model and scope of services, prescribing both buprenorphine and naltrexone to patients with opioid use disorder. Patients also receive behavioral health and counseling services, as well as access to intensive outpatient programming designed to help stabilize more acute patients and lay the stage for their long-term recovery. In this office-based opioid treatment program model, medications are not dispensed on location; rather, patients are provided a prescription for take-home doses, a schedule that is especially well suited to patients in maintenance phases of recovery.

Higham noted, “We know that a combination of MAT services can be effectively offered in both physician offices and opioid treatment centers. Expanding into office-based opioid treatment programs opens a range of choices for patients seeking treatment and recovery solutions. The challenge for us in finding the right partner was identifying clinicians in the market who already understand this clinical model and are delivering it effectively today. Wellness Ambulatory Care was unique in this regard.”

“We knew that there was strong clinical alignment philosophically,” said Clifford Davidson, MD of Wellness Ambulatory Care. “We were impressed with BHG’s patient-centered, comprehensive approach to opioid treatment. BHG is a recognized leader in Opioid Treatment Programs, so it makes sense to look at a combination of clinical operating models when considering patient access to care.” Dr. Davidson, who will stay on at BHG Medical Services — Knoxville as the Medical Director, noted, “Our experience delivering general psychiatric services to a broader range of patients is an enhancement to BHG’s clinical model and enables us to deliver life-saving and life-changing treatment here in Tennessee.”

BHG’s approach to treatment is individualized under physician supervision in an outpatient setting. Through evidence-based programs such as MAT, successful recovery is possible. These programs demonstrate excellent results as measured by almost all objective criteria – abstinence from substance use, improvements in employment, family dynamics, and general well-being.

All BHG locations across Tennessee accept all three TennCare health plans (BCBCS TN/BlueCare, Amerigroup and United Community Care) Cigna, and both commercial and Medicare Advantage plans from Optum and Humana. BHG also welcomes patients who choose to self-pay, and TDMHSAS grant funding may be available for qualified patients.

The Company’s mission is to expand access to evidence-based treatment in underserved markets across the United States. BHG Medical Services — Knoxville is an office based opioid treatment program located at 6626 Central Avenue Pike, Knoxville, TN, 37912. With this acquisition, BHG now operates 11 centers across Tennessee for a total of 74 locations in 15 states.

About BHG

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the U.S., delivering comprehensive, personalized evidence-based medical and behavioral therapies for individuals with opioid use disorder. With 71 locations in 15 states, BHG has more than 1,200 employees who serve more than 22,000 patients. To learn more, visit bhgrecovery.com.

Dallas, TX—October 20, 2020—

Keeping up its tradition of encouraging employees to follow the highest of standards, Behavioral Health Group announced today that it will be participating in Corporate Compliance & Ethics Week, organized each year by the Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics & Health Care Compliance Association (SCCE & HCCA). As a part of its efforts Behavioral Health Group will be providing team members with new and interesting information about compliance and ethics in the workplace and will be holding various contests with the opportunity for team members to win prizes. The first annual Integrity Award will be given to a team member nominated by a peer for outstanding displays of integrity in the workplace, and the Compliance Department will be presenting the new branding to the organization.

Jay Higham, BHG’s Chief Executive Officer, shares that “Having a clear understanding of the expectations around corporate compliance lets each of us stay focused on BHG’s broader goals and help operations run smoothly. Maintaining compliance equips us to do our jobs well, reach our career goals, and keep patients safe and happy. In turn, BHG can achieve its goals and grow faster.”

Corporate Compliance and Ethics Week is an extension of Behavioral Health Group’s ongoing compliance and ethics program, which is headed by Marlin Martin, Sr. Vice President of Regulatory and Clinical Affairs.

Company-wide compliance and ethics education, held at the time of hire and again annually allows BHG to roll-out new and updated compliance and ethics program policies and reinforce with employees their compliance and ethics obligations. Participation in Corporate Compliance and Ethics Week gives additional opportunity to shine a spotlight on the importance of compliance and ethics and boost compliance culture.

About BHG

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the U.S., delivering comprehensive, personalized evidence-based medical and behavioral therapies for individuals with opioid use disorder. With 71 locations in 15 states, BHG has more than 1,200 employees who serve more than 22,000 patients. To learn more, visit bhgrecovery.com.

About Corporate Compliance & Ethics Week

Corporate Compliance & Ethics Week began in May 2005 as a way to help members of SCCE & HCCA to increase awareness of compliance and ethics issues at their organizations. It has since grown to an annual event that is celebrated around the world. Find out more at the Official Corporate Compliance Week Website.

Dallas, TX—October 16, 2020—

Responding to the continued public health crisis of opioid addiction in the US, Behavioral Health Group (BHG), the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the US, today announced their expanding footprint in Alabama with the acquisition of Huntsville Recovery, Inc. in Huntsville, AL and Stevenson Recovery, Inc. in Stevenson, AL. The businesses, jointly employing 52 clinicians, counselors, and staff will become known as BHG Huntsville Treatment Center and BHG Stevenson Treatment Center, respectively.

“Opioid addiction continues to ravage communities across the United States, exacerbated by the current coronavirus pandemic,” said Jay Higham, Chief Executive Officer of BHG. “Our Company’s mission is to expand access to evidence-based treatment in underserved markets across the United States. We entered Alabama in February 2017 with one treatment center, and within three years we now have nine facilities serving communities across the state. The addition of BHG Huntsville Treatment Center — the largest recovery treatment center in Alabama — and BHG Stevenson Treatment Center into the BHG family is a significant value-add to our company and to these Alabama communities.” With these new locations, BHG now operates nine centers across Alabama for a total of 73 locations in 15 states.

Noted George Payne, owner of both Huntsville Recovery, Inc. and Stevenson Recovery, Inc., “We’ve spent considerable time evaluating multiple offers from competing companies. In the end, our mission was to find the company who would continue to treat our patients and our staff with the level of care and respect they deserve. Over the last couple of years, we watched as BHG acquired other treatment centers in Alabama, and the results consistently pointed to an organization dedicated to people first, be it patient or staff member.” BHG becomes the largest provider of recovery treatment centers in Alabama. Added Payne, “BHG is here for the long haul. The opioid epidemic will be a battle for years to come, and I’m glad that our staff has this opportunity for stable and meaningful employment.”

The Company’s approach to treatment is individualized under physician supervision in an outpatient setting. Through evidence-based programs such as Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), successful recovery is possible. MAT, the gold standard of care for opioid addiction, utilizes the combination of FDA approved medications with a full modality of behavioral health counseling and other support services for a comprehensive treatment approach to addiction and co-occurring mental health conditions. These programs demonstrate excellent results as measured by almost all objective criteria – abstinence from drug use, improvements in employment, family dynamics, and general well-being.

“We knew that there was strong clinical alignment philosophically,” said Danah White, Chief Operating Officer of both Huntsville Recovery, Inc. and Stevenson Recovery, Inc. “We were impressed with BHG’s patient-centered, comprehensive approach to opioid treatment. BHG has proven to be a leader in this treatment approach, and I know our staffs look forward to working with their new peers at BHG to improve access to life-saving and life-changing treatment here in Alabama.”

All BHG locations across Alabama including Huntsville and Stevenson accept State Medicaid. BHG is in the process of bringing Medicare options to both Huntsville and Stevenson patients. BHG also welcomes patients who choose to self-pay, and grant funding may be available for qualified patients.

BHG Huntsville Treatment Center is an Opioid Treatment Program located at 4040 Independence Drive NW, Huntsville, AL 35816. BHG Stevenson Treatment Center is an Opioid Treatment Program located at 196 County Road 85, Stevenson, AL 35772. BHG also has recovery treatment centers in Tuscaloosa, Gadsden, Sheffield, Bessemer, Cullman, Mobile, and Grand Bay.

About BHG

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the U.S., delivering comprehensive, personalized evidence-based medical and behavioral therapies for individuals with opioid use disorder. With 71 locations in 15 states, BHG has more than 1,200 employees who serve more than 22,000 patients. To learn more, visit bhgrecovery.com.

Dallas, TX—September 29, 2020

Responding to the continued public health crisis of opioid addiction in the US, Behavioral Health Group (BHG), the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the US, today announced their expansion into Rhode Island with the acquisition of the Center for Treatment & Recovery (CTR), LLC in Pawtucket, RI. The business, currently employing 23 clinicians, mental health professionals, and staff, will become known as BHG Pawtucket Treatment Center.

“Opioid addiction continues to ravage communities across the United States, exacerbated by the current coronavirus pandemic,” said Jay Higham, Chief Executive Officer of BHG. “Our Company’s mission is to expand access to evidence-based treatment in underserved markets across the United States. The joining of BHG Pawtucket Treatment Center into the BHG family is a significant value-add to our company and to the Pawtucket community.” With this new location, BHG now operates 71 locations in 15 states.

The Company’s approach to treatment is individualized under physician supervision in an outpatient setting. Through evidence-based programs such as Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), successful recovery is possible. MAT, the gold standard of care for opioid addiction, utilizes the combination of FDA approved medications with a full modality of behavioral health counseling and other support services for a comprehensive treatment approach to addiction. These programs demonstrate excellent results as measured by almost all objective criteria – abstinence from drug use, improvements in employment, family dynamics, and general well-being.

“We knew that there was strong clinical alignment philosophically,” said Wendy Looker, co-founder of CTR. “We were impressed with BHG’s patient-centered, comprehensive approach to opioid treatment. BHG has proven to be a leader in this treatment approach, and I know the team looks forward to working with their peers at BHG to improve access to life-saving and life-changing treatment here in Rhode Island.”
BHG Pawtucket Treatment Center is an Opioid Treatment Program located at 82 Pond Street, Pawtucket, RI, 02860.

About BHG

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the U.S., delivering comprehensive, personalized evidence-based medical and behavioral therapies for individuals with opioid use disorder. With 71 locations in 15 states, BHG has more than 1,200 employees who serve more than 22,000 patients. To learn more, visit bhgrecovery.com.

Dr. Vivek Murthy serves as chair and Dr. Leana Wen is inaugural member of a growing Board

Dallas, TX—September 16, 2020

Behavioral Health Group (BHG), the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the US, today announced the creation of its new Advisory Board, with Vivek Murthy, MD, and Leana Wen, MD, as its inaugural members. The Board will provide counsel and serve as a strategic resource for BHG as the company works to expand its best-in-class opioid treatment services and build relationships with policy leaders, payors, providers and key stakeholders.

“Quality and innovation in addiction treatment are two of BHG’s key values, which is why I’m pleased to welcome two of our country’s most distinguished public health leaders, Dr. Vivek Murthy and Dr. Leana Wen, to our new Advisory board,” said Jay Higham, president and CEO of BHG. “They provide a strong foundation to our growing Board, which will include a diverse set of stakeholders in medicine, policy and public health who share BHG’s dedication to solving the national opioid crisis.”

The Board, for which BHG is still actively recruiting, is chaired by Dr. Murthy and will comprise health care and policy leaders across the political spectrum with experience in advancing evidence-based substance use disorder treatment. In addition to lending their knowledge, expertise and time to support the company’s growth, Board members will provide counsel on the policy and procedures needed to expand the substance use disorder treatment model to include appropriate service delivery for co-occurring mental health disorders, polysubstance abuse and other behavioral cross addictions.

“Ending the opioid epidemic has been a long-standing priority for me. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic threatens to worsen the opioid crisis, undoing our country’s progress in stemming opioid deaths and putting more lives at risk,” said  Vivek Murthy, MD, MBA, former Surgeon General of the United States and chair of BHG’s Advisory Board. “I am impressed with BHG’s patient-centered, comprehensive approach to opioid treatment, and I’m eager to work with them and fellow advisors to ensure people struggling with opioid use disorders get the care they need.”

Dr. Murthy served as the 19th Surgeon General of the United States from December 2014 to April 2017. He was the nation’s first Surgeon General to recognize addiction as a chronic illness and issued the first-ever Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health called “Facing Addiction in America.” Before releasing the report, he issued a letter to 2.3 million health care professionals, urging them to join a movement to address America’s opioid epidemic—the first time in the history of the office that a Surgeon General has issued a letter calling the medical profession to action. In 2009, Dr. Murthy founded Doctors for America, a national nonprofit focused on improving access to affordable and high-quality health care, and most recently, he authored a New York Times’ best-selling book, “Together: The Healing Power of Human Connection in a Sometimes Lonely World.”

“When it comes to treating opioid use disorder, we know what works—medication-assisted treatment combined with behavioral therapy and wraparound supports. BHG has proven to be a leader in this treatment approach, and I look forward to working with them to improve access to life-saving and life-changing treatment and to turn the tide on the devastating opioid crisis.” said Leana Wen, MD, MSc, FAAEM, emergency physician, public health professor at George Washington University’s School of Public Health and BHG Advisory Board member.

Dr. Wen obtained her medical degree from Washington University School of Medicine and studied health policy at the University of Oxford, where she was a Rhodes Scholar. She served as Baltimore’s Health Commissioner from December 2014–October 2018, where she led the city’s opioid overdose prevention and response plan. The plan included street outreach teams to target individuals most at risk, a pilot of a stabilization center for addiction and mental health, and a “blanket prescription” of naloxone to 620,000 Baltimoreans that has saved over 3,000 lives in three years. In 2019, Dr. Wen was named one of Modern Healthcare’s Top 50 Physician-Executives and TIME magazine’s 100 Most Influential People. Dr. Wen is also the author of the book “When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests.”

About BHG

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the U.S., delivering comprehensive, personalized evidence-based medical and behavioral therapies for individuals with opioid use disorder. With 71 locations in 15 states, BHG has more than 1,200 employees who serve more than 22,000 patients. To learn more, visit bhgrecovery.com.

We’re proud to announce that we’ve been selected as the first provider in the state of Louisiana to offer 24/7 outpatient opioid addiction treatment at our New Orleans Westbank Treatment Center, one of three centers in Louisiana.

“Addiction does not keep normal business hours. Waiting for the nearest treatment center to open can be a matter of life or death for people living with OUD who are seeking help,” said Amanda Karistai, Regional Vice President at BHG. “We are looking forward to working with the community of New Orleans to provide the full spectrum of opioid treatment services, so people living with OUD know they can access treatment at BHG the very moment they need it.”

When it comes to treating OUD, outpatient medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is the gold standard, as it is an evidence-based care model that allows patients to receive necessary medication and counseling while continuing their daily lives. Almost all OTPs, which are the only treatment providers able to offer all three FDA-approved medications for OUD (buprenorphine, methadone and naltrexone), are only open during the daytime. For those living with OUD—especially those seeking help for the first time—the need for care often strikes at night.

Now, with the help of state funding, BHG is able to provide 24/7 outpatient opioid addiction treatment for those with OUD in the Greater New Orleans area.

According to federal data, only 1 in 20 Louisiana residents who needed treatment for substance use disorder received it in 2019, compared to the 1 in 9 nationally. Recognizing the urgent need to address the state’s OUD treatment issue, Louisiana leaders have taken significant measures in recent years to increase access to evidence-based treatment and reduce overdose deaths—including applying funds from the Louisiana State Opioid Response grant by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to extend the hours of the BHG New Orleans Westbank Treatment Center to be open 24/7.

Additionally, as of January 20, 2020, Medicaid covers services at OTPs, meaning Medicaid patients in Louisiana can receive MAT with no out-of-pocket costs. BHG contracts with all five Louisiana managed care organizations for OTP services. Original Medicare, which all BHG centers accept, also fully covers OTP treatment with no out-of-pocket costs as of January 1, 2020.

“We’re excited to partner with BHG because of their commitment and proven success in providing evidence-based medical and behavioral therapies tailored to the unique needs of each patient,” said Traci Perry, State Opioid Treatment Authority of the Louisiana Department of Health. “We’re proud to say that Louisiana has taken several positive steps towards reducing opioid deaths and increasing access to medication-assisted treatment in our state.”

We’re closely following recommendations by federal and local officials to keep patients and staff safe since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak. This includes providing additional take-home doses based on each person’s treatment plan and state regulations, conducting counseling via telehealth and requiring staff to practice social distancing and wear personal protective gear to mitigate the risk of exposure at all times. See our complete list of COVID-19 protective protocols.

BHG New Orleans Westbank Treatment Center—one of three BHG locations in Louisiana—is located at 1141 Whitney Avenue Building 4, Gretna, LA 70056. To learn more about the facility, please visit the center’s page or call 504-343-8798. Walk-ins are welcome 24/7 with no appointment needed.

For more information on our COVID-19 protocols, please see our COVID-19 response. If you are seeking more information on opioid use disorder treatment for yourself or a loved one, please visit BHGrecovery.com or call 844-535-7291 for resources and support.

We’re proud to announce that today we’ve opened a new facility in Colorado Springs in our continued commitment to ensure that every patient seeking opioid addiction treatment has access to comprehensive, personalized evidence-based treatment. Our new Colorado Springs center is the first in the city to offer full-spectrum evidence-based opioid addiction treatment. Read the full press release below, originally published via PR Newswire.

Opioid addiction, or opioid use disorder (OUD), is a complex disease that unfortunately has not been adequately treated over the years. In 2018, more than 540 Coloradans died from opioid overdose, many of which could have been avoided with proper treatment. BHG’s treatment approach, which centers on medication-assisted treatment (MAT)— the gold standard for OUD treatment—has been proven to help patients achieve long-term recovery. 99% of BHG patients reported that their mental health and quality of life have improved since starting treatment and more than 60% of unemployed patients obtain employment after one year of treatment at a BHG facility.

“At BHG, we understand that opioid use disorder is a chronic disease of the brain that requires evidence-based treatment and management,” said Amanda Malone-White, Regional Director of Colorado at BHG. “We are now bringing the full spectrum of opioid treatment services, including behavioral and medical therapies, to those living with opioid addiction in Colorado Springs, so they can safely access the treatment and support they need to achieve long-term recovery during this difficult time when they may be needing it most.”

The BHG Colorado Springs Treatment Center provides MAT in an outpatient setting, including all FDA-approved OUD medications, allowing patients to receive treatment while continuing their daily lives. The new BHG Center will be the first in Colorado Springs to offer comprehensive outpatient OUD treatment options personalized to the needs of each patient—from counseling alone to intensive outpatient care that combines medication with more rigorous counseling and behavioral therapy.

“As our country faces two public health crises concurrently—the coronavirus pandemic and the opioid epidemic—we understand that many people in addiction recovery or who are seeking treatment may be concerned about being able to access care,” said Jay Higham, CEO of BHG. “We are committed to providing treatment that upholds the highest standards of care to those who need it, and we’re proud to open our Colorado Springs treatment center doors to bring our best in class treatment to more people during these trying times.”

In light of COVID-19, BHG is continuing to put the safety of its patients and staff first and are complying with all federal and state regulations, from disinfection methods to telecounseling. For a full updated list of BHG’s protective measures against COVID-19, please visit our coronavirus response page.

The new facility in Colorado Springs, which is the sixth BHG treatment center in Colorado, is located at 4157 Centennial Blvd. CO Springs, CO 80907. To learn more about the facility and its hours of operation, please visit the center’s page or call 719-598-9750.

 

See the full press release on PR Newswire.

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For more information on our COVID-19 protocols, please see our COVID-19 response. If you are seeking more information on opioid use disorder treatment for yourself or a loved one, please visit BHGrecovery.com or call 844-535-7291 for resources and support.

By Amanda Karistai, MBA, LCSW-BACS, Regional Vice President at BHG

 

If you’ve been considering seeking treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD), now is the time.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, it might seem easier to focus on what’s happening in the world and in our communities, while continuing to use substances such as pain pills or heroin to help cope with the increased anxiety and stress. While kids are home, people have lost jobs and loved ones have gotten sick, getting treatment may be the last thing you think you should be doing now. But if you’ve been thinking about taking that step, there’s no better time.

During a crisis situation like COVID-19, individuals with substance use disorders may use illicit drugs as a way to cope. We all deal with stress differently, and it’s likely that the extra stress and fear you’re facing right now will increase your desire to use. This situation is a lot to handle; there are changes to everyday life that can be so overwhelming that you feel there’s nowhere else to turn. So, you keep using. Or maybe you’ve stopped for a few days, but now the pressure is too much and you started up again. Instead of using less, it’s easy to begin using more, perhaps without even realizing it. When this happens, you may be at an even higher risk of overdose than normal.

Or, maybe you have nothing going on and aren’t overwhelmed at all. Perhaps some parts of your life have gotten incredibly boring. Being quarantined can have a huge impact on our mental health, and boredom often impacts substance use. We know that routine is a positive coping skill that keeps people from relapse. Without this routine, structure or accountability, you may find yourself wanting to use more often or larger amounts than you normally would.

This pandemic has also brought new threats related to using, including obtaining drugs that are sourced from new places or different people. The risk of contracting COVID-19 is higher due to potentially infected equipment or supplies, as well as prolonged exposure to individuals you don’t know. If you currently have untreated hepatitis C, you may also be at a greater risk of contracting and/or having complications related to COVID-19. And of course, with “Shelter-in-Place” or “Stay-at-Home” orders in effect throughout the country, even leaving your home may result in fines or charges. As these restrictions start to loosen, continue be cautious – the risks are still high.

Life After COVID-19

While it may be hard to imagine, COVID-19 will pass. Things will be different, but it’s likely that most of us will return to some sense of normal life, and we’ll resume a lot of the habits we had before this. Opioid use doesn’t have to be one of the things you go back to. You have an opportunity, right now, to begin your recovery journey.

At BHG, where I’ve worked for nearly a decade, people living with OUD can enter into a medication assisted treatment (MAT) program — a form of treatment that gives you the best chance at ending illicit drug use. MAT combines counseling and other support services with medications like methadone or buprenorphine. With qualified clinicians and medical professionals, you’ll develop a treatment plan based on your goals, and then work together to meet them. Along the way, you’ll receive medication monitoring to help alleviate withdrawal symptoms, allowing you to return to a normal level of functioning without misuse of drugs.

In BHG’s treatment program, you’ll have access to useful resources, including counseling, case management, and peer support services (all done via telehealth to protect your safety during the pandemic). Your treatment team will also assess other potential health risks and connect you with an outside primary care provider if needed. Ultimately, you’ll have people committed to supporting you during these difficult times as you take the necessary steps towards recovery.

If you are living with OUD and think that now may be the time to enter treatment, we are here for you.

BHG has put special processes in place to limit risk of exposure to COVID-19 in our centers and keep our patients and team members safe. If you’re concerned about affording treatment, there may be ways you can still receive care at BHG, and we want to help you with that. If you aren’t ready to be all in, that’s okay too. We can discuss treatment options, assist you in applying for things like Medicaid or unemployment, or point you in the right direction of other resources. Or we’ll just listen. Everyone needs a little help right now, and we have people standing by. So, don’t wait. This is a scary time, and we’ll support you whether this is your first time thinking about treatment, or you’ve been through this before. We’re in this together, and we can’t wait to help you begin your journey.

By Forest Wilson, article originally published in The Colorado Independent on April 29, 2020

Before the COVID-19 pandemic struck, Wendy Dyson would take the 6 a.m. bus every weekday from Commerce City to a Denver methadone clinic for treatment and then catch an Uber to make it to work by 7.

To keep receiving her medication, Dyson, recovering from her addiction to pain medication, also had to see a counselor once a month at the clinic. It was always a logistical challenge.

“The clinic is only open from 5 to 11:30 [in the morning], and I work from 7 to 3:30 normally… so having time to meet is a bit of a challenge,” Dyson said. “There’s only so many hours in the day.”

Now, the clinic gives Dyson extra doses of methadone to take home, so she only has to come into the clinic three times a week. And her counseling sessions are taking place over the phone.

Both changes are designed to minimize the social spread of the new coronavirus, but Dyson would be just as happy to see them continue once the threat of infection has passed.

The coronavirus pandemic has changed — perhaps permanently — how people like Dyson receive treatment for substance use disorder. Pandemic-related rules are allowing providers to be more flexible in how they administer medications, such as methadone, to patients who need it. And, in an even bigger change, Dyson’s methadone clinic and other behavioral health providers have turned to a tool largely unavailable to them pre-pandemic: telehealth appointments. State and federal regulations, as well insurance coverage gaps, prevented widespread use of video or telephone appointments in the past.

The pandemic “is requiring us at the state to be really flexible and think outside the box and reexamine our rules and our structures that have been in place for a really long time,” said Camille Harding, division director for community behavioral health for the Colorado Office of Behavioral Health. “That’s probably a good thing in the long term.”

Telehealth as a new tool, but not a replacement

In 2018, the year with the most recent available data, Colorado’s 626 licensed substance use disorder treatment sites recorded 42,605 admissions for substance use treatment. Behavioral health providers have remained open through COVID-19 shutdown orders, but most visits have been moved to telehealth. On March 17, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services shifted its rules to allow healthcare providers to widely use telehealth services “during the COVID-19 national emergency, which also constitutes a nationwide public health emergency.”

Since mid-March, Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance also adopted policies to cover telehealth visits.

Colorado’s interpretation around its requirements for “face-to-face” appointments for counseling sessions or other appointments has changed, Harding said.

People used to have to go across town for appointments, sometimes with kids in tow, she said, when they could have had the same benefit sitting at home.

“It [telehealth] takes some of the stress and burden off of people to try to make it to appointments on time,” Harding said.

Tina Beckley, director of clinical affairs for Behavioral Health Group (BHG), which operates six medication-assisted therapy (MAT) clinics in Colorado including Dyson’s, said many patients are reporting they are “getting a lot out of telehealth.” First, they don’t have to go anywhere, she said, and second, counseling over the phone is easier and causes some people less anxiety than meeting in person.

“We have patients running in and out of the program; they can’t stay, they can’t go to work late,” Beckley said. “But they’re able to talk on the phone at 5 o’clock at night, rather than stay for an appointment at 9 in the morning.”

Telehealth isn’t perfect, she said. Scheduling phone-calls can be difficult for some low-income patients without access to reliable cell phone service.

But having the option for counseling via phone or video call would help in the future after the pandemic, Beckley said, as long as the requirements and standards remain the same as in-person visits, ensuring patients’ care doesn’t suffer.

Treatment in rural areas

Telehealth “is a game-changer” in rural Colorado, said Tony Sullivan, chief clinical officer at Solvista Health. Solvista Health, headquartered in Cañon City, provides outpatient substance use disorder treatment for residents in Chaffee, Lake, Fremont and Custer counties.

Transportation historically has been a barrier to substance use disorder treatment, particularly for people who don’t have a car or can’t get off a snow-covered mountain, he said, and Solvista has been trying to implement telehealth service for more than a year and a half. Regulations, billing and patient privacy concerns made that challenging, he said. Once the regulations changed last month, it took only two days for the staff to transition outpatient services to telehealth, he said.

“It’s going to help us access clients that really need treatment that just simply can’t make it to the office,” Sullivan said.

Access to the internet also has been a challenge in some areas. In those cases, counselors provide therapy over the phone, he said. But, the majority of patients have been able to connect for video calls over the internet, he said, which counselors prefer over phone calls.

“There’s a clinical value to being able to meet face-to-face,” Sullivan said.

Julie Zavage, Solvista’s outpatient substance use disorder program director, said the clinic has provided gift cards for patients who don’t have phones to purchase them.

All of the clinic’s outpatient services can’t be done through telehealth. Drug testing is a key part of holding patients accountable and encouraging sobriety, Sullivan said, but the clinic chose to discontinue such testing for some areas during the pandemic. Some patients also may not have a private space at home to talk to counselors, Zavage said, and some patients are at higher risk for relapse and really need in-person assessments, which aren’t an option right now.

Zavage doesn’t envision telehealth as the first option for treatment in the future, she said, because in-person group therapy is often the best treatment for people in the first stages of recovery. She said counselors also take cues from people face-to-face that they can’t as easily via video. Still, it is a good option to have, she said.

Sullivan said he hopes Medicare and commercial insurances will continue to pay for telehealth after the pandemic ends.

Fewer visits for medication

Dyson spent 25 years as an insurance agent, she said, until office life grew to be unbearable. She recently switched professions to construction, which allowed her to get outside and has the added benefit, she said, of being essential during the state’s coronavirus shut-downs.

Dyson is thrilled she only has to go to the clinic three times a week, instead of every day, she said. But that flexibility doesn’t apply to everyone with a substance use disorder.

New patients or at-risk patients still must come in every day, BHG’s Beckley said. But fewer visits to the clinic means fewer people in the waiting area, and reduces the risk for coronavirus infection among the staff and patients.

For new patients, it’s essential to have that daily commitment and support the clinic offers for every dose, Dyson said, but she said she thinks her sobriety is now strong enough to forgo a daily check-in.

She’s felt stress and fear since the coronavirus spread, she said, but not any added desire to use drugs.

“I take my dose in the morning and I don’t think about it,” Dyson said. “I’m living my life, rather than being an addict where every waking second is controlled, and in some way affected, by drugs.”

 

Read the full article in The Colorado Independent.

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For more information on our COVID-19 protocols, please see our COVID-19 response. If you are seeking more information on opioid use disorder treatment for yourself or a loved one, please visit BHGrecovery.com or call 844-535-7291 for resources and support.

Letter To Congress To Urge Financial Support For Opioid Addiction Treatment For Newly Uninsured

BHG is an essential health care provider providing comprehensive, personalized evidence-based medical and behavioral therapies to 20,000 patients living with opioid use disorder across 14 states. Deemed an essential health service by the government, our team of over 1,000 members are currently on the front lines of two public health crises simultaneously — the opioid epidemic and the global coronavirus pandemic.

We are in a unique position to share how this epidemic is impacting our patients, and we feel a tremendous responsibility to advocate on their behalf. Some of our patients are starting to forgo treatment due to job loss. We know that abrupt disruption in treatment means patients will relapse at high rates, meaning more tragic overdoses, straining our already-overtaxed emergency rooms, and putting patients at increased risk of COVID-19 transmission and exposure.

As part of the Medication-Assisted Treatment Leadership Council, we have asked Congress to provide financial relief to help our patients continue receiving care. As NIDA Director, Dr. Nora Volkow, has recently urged, “under no circumstances can we forget or marginalize persons with [substance use disorder] during this new public health crisis.”

Read the letter in its entirety below.

Funding and Flexibility is Needed to Ensure Continued Access to Opioid Use Disorder Treatment During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Social Distancing and Job Loss Jeopardizing Ability to Provide Care

Opioid Treatment Programs (OTPs) provide daily, lifesaving treatment to roughly 450,000 patients suffering from opioid use disorder (OUD). Federal and state regulations require patients visit our facilities every day to receive medication to help stabilize their physical dependence and often weekly to receive counseling to promote their recovery. OTPs provide essential health services. Specifically, our patients must ingest their medication while being observed by licensed program staff every day until such time as they demonstrate progress and stability in treatment through drug tests and intensive counseling services. If our facilities were to close, our patients would be at a significant risk of relapse, overdose, and death. During these trying times and social distancing requirements, we have taken the necessary steps to continue treating our patients – but we need federal support in order to ensure patient care is not disrupted as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. Specifically, the Medication-Assisted Leadership Council (MATLC) is seeking the following assistance:

PROVIDE MUCH-NEEDED, IMMEDIATE FUNDING TO MAINTAIN TREATMENT FACILITY OPERATIONS

Because of the current pandemic, we find ourselves treating a greater number of patients who have recently become uninsured and we are absorbing higher staffing costs for employees who are concerned about going to work and risking exposure to COVID-19. Before the pandemic, roughly 32% of our patients were uninsured and paid out-of-pocket for treatment. Now, our uninsured patient population is rapidly growing as many of these patients work in the service industry, construction, or “gig economy” where hours are limited and health benefits are rare. As our nation endures the fallout from the COVID-19 crisis, many of these patients are losing their jobs and will be unable to continue to pay for their treatment. Decades of science shows that 80% of patients who drop out of MAT will relapse within 12 months. Relapse will result in significant increases in illegal drug use, mortality, crime, incarceration, and a strain on our health care system when it can least afford it.

Moreover, it is becoming increasingly more expensive to retain qualified staff. Hospitals face similar challenges retaining nurses given the inherent risks associated with the profession. As hospitals receive hundreds of billions of dollars in federal aid, they are able to attract and retain nurses by offering higher pay – something OTPs cannot currently do. As a result, our staff is at risk of being recruited away from our facilities. Further, as Americans follow CDC guidance around social distancing, we find ourselves having to pay staff more to retain their services.

Lastly, like other providers, OTPs have absorbed significant costs purchasing personal protective equipment and implementing other safety precautions. Not unlike hospitals, OTPs must remain open regardless of the seriousness of the pandemic or Americans will die.

As a result of the confluence of factors impacting OTPs, we respectfully request dedicated federal funding, like other essential health care providers are receiving, to sustain our critical infrastructure delivering essential medical services. Unfortunately, because of size and scope, many of our companies do not qualify for the new small business loans. Given that OTPs just became Medicare-eligible providers this year with passage of the SUPPORT Act, we do not benefit from the advance payment program. Therefore, OTPs are requesting $300 million in funding to support the delivery of uncompensated care, staff retention, and continuation of safety precautions. As a point of reference, this amount represents roughly 15% of OTP annual revenue.

THE MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT LEADERSHIP COUNCIL COMPRISES NEARLY 300 OTPs ACROSS 39 STATES

ABILITY TO ADMIT ALL NEW OUD PATIENTS VIA TELEHEALTH

We are encouraged that SAMHSA and many state regulatory agencies have quickly adapted to CDC guidance for social distancing, affording OTPs greater flexibility to dispense take-home medication, with physician discretion, to our patients. SAMHSA has allowed OTPs to use telemedicine to conduct initial patient medical examinations – but only for patients that are ordered buprenorphine as part of their medication-assisted treatment (MAT) program. Physicians in OTPs need to be able to tailor treatment regimens, including the medication, to the patient’s unique needs and situation. For some patients, buprenorphine may be the best medication, but for others, the most clinically-appropriate medication may be methadone. Unfortunately, our physicians are not allowed to order methadone for new patients admitted via telehealth under the current relaxed guidance. This limitation presents a significant barrier to implementation of these much-needed rules and compromises access to patient-centered care.

As such, the MATLC asks that Congress instruct SAMHSA to immediately permit OTPs to use telehealth, (synchronous audio and video connections) to conduct the initial medical exam for admission to an OTP and treatment with methadone for the duration of the COVID-19 emergency declaration.

Coronavirus Update: Last updated November 4, 2020

At BHG, our patients’ health has always been our top priority.

We are continuing to put the safety of our patients and staff first and can assure you that we are proactively complying with every CDC-issued recommendation, from disinfection methods to procedures that dramatically limit the number of individuals going into our centers.

The measures we have put in place are as follows:

  • Counseling is now done via in-person and tele-counseling (where physical distancing guidelines can be met and as states permit). Please contact your local BHG center for details.
  • Parameters for take-home privileges may be temporarily expanded. For some patients, this could mean additional take-home medications for those that they are currently receiving. The specific amount of medication we can send home with patients varies under state laws and regulations and is dependent on each patient’s individual treatment plan and stage of recovery.
  • Anyone who has a known exposure to COVID-19, or is experiencing symptoms, or who has tested positive for COVID-19, are asked to phone the treatment center before arrival, and then stay in their vehicle to receive their medications. Staff are stationed at the door of each center to help screen all individuals entering the facility.
  • We’re requiring all persons (patients, staff, and visitors) entering BHG facilities to practice physical distancing and wear personal protective equipment like masks and gloves. Additionally, we’re thoroughly disinfecting our centers throughout the day.

We continue to find ourselves in an unprecedented time as we come together to fight two public health crises simultaneously — an opioid epidemic and the global coronavirus pandemic — and we will continue to ensure that every effort we make is done to strengthen and improve the lives and communities of those we serve.

To our patients and their families: we encourage you to join us in these efforts by speaking with your counselor or calling your local center before stopping in. We will continue to share updates on our website and social media as the situation evolves. Please also see below for responses to some of the most frequently asked questions we’ve received.

Our centers are still open and providing care, including new admissions. If you are ready to begin your recovery journey, or if you have state- or center-specific questions, contact your local BHG center to get the most up-to-date information, and we ask that you call before going in for a physical visit. Please reach out to us if you need help as we navigate these challenging times together.

Frequently asked questions

Will my treatment center stay open?

All BHG centers are remaining open at this time to provide care to existing patients as well as admit new patients. However, hours may have been modified at some centers. Please call your center for its updated hours. To find the center nearest you, visit our locations directory.

Do I need to come in for treatment?

You will need to come in to pick up your medication. However, we have expanded take-home doses at all our centers depending on each patient’s treatment plan and state regulations to reduce the frequency of patient visits to our centers. And although in-person counseling is available at most locations, speak to your counselor about extending tele-counseling as an alternative.

What do I do if I have COVID-19 symptoms on the day I come to BHG?

If you are experiencing symptoms or tested positive for COVID-19, please call the treatment center before your arrival, and we will handle your individual case on an as-needed basis.

How can I get additional take-home doses?

While all our centers have expanded take-home privileges in response to COVID-19, the specific amount of medication you can take home will depend on your stage of recovery, and state laws and regulations. Your care team will work with you to determine the number of take-home doses allowed. Please call your center if you have any questions regarding your medication.

What if BHG runs out of medication?

Medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder is deemed by the Department of Health and Human Services as an essential service. As such, the Department has stated that the medications will not be in short supply due to COVID-19. BHG has worked diligently to ensure appropriate medication inventory across all our locations.

Do I have to get counseling since I’m not coming into the center?

Yes, you will still need to continue your counseling sessions as part of your treatment plan determined by your care team. In-person counseling is available at most locations, and we are extending tele-counseling as an alternative. Please call your center regarding your counseling schedule should you have questions or wish to change how you connect with your counselor. It is common these days to feel more anxiety and deal with additional stressors and your counselor is available to help. Please reach out.

I lost my job and am experiencing financial distress; how do I pay for treatment?

Depending on the state you live in, you may be eligible for federal insurance, such as Medicaid or Medicare, or a financial grant. The staff at your center can help you determine what your options are for coverage of your treatment. Please call your center if your financial situation has changed and our counselors will help identify possible payment options.

Click here for a printable version of BHG’s COVID-19 updates and FAQ.

More than 2 million people individuals each year are impacted by opioid addiction.[1] At BHG, we are committed to removing barriers to treatment and helping individuals on their path to recovery – and often the first barriers patients and their families encounter are the myths and stigmas that exist around opioid treatment and addiction. By breaking these myths down, we can help people reclaim their lives through tailored, evidence-based care. Below, we’re debunking five myths about opioid treatment

Myth 1: Shouldn’t people be able to “just quit?”

Overcoming a drug addiction can be extremely difficult on your own. After tolerance develops then any attempt to decrease or stop taking the drug produces severe withdrawals. These withdrawal symptoms, including nausea, muscle aches, increased heart rate, tremors, anxiety, and drug cravings are extremely powerful motivators to return to drug use, which immediately relieves these symptoms.

Though intensity varies based on the patient’s risk factors and level of dependence, opioid withdrawal symptoms can be one of the most significant barriers to successful recovery.[2] Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) combines medication, counseling, and support to overcome withdrawals and manage the physical symptoms of addiction.

Myth 2: Treatment is like quitting cold turkey.

Withdrawal or detoxing can be intimidating, but MAT can help people living with addiction manage these symptoms. Physical dependence can be one of the most challenging parts of overcoming opioid addiction, but MAT helps aid in recovery by providing relief from withdrawal symptoms and cravings, while allowing them to concentrate on other important obligations of life such as family and employment. These FDA-approved treatments help patients’ bodies transition away from opioid dependence and, in combination with other support services within MAT, meet the needs of most patients seeking recovery.[3] Our treatment model includes medical treatment, counseling, behavioral treatment and outpatient drug treatment. From day one, patients receive individualized care and personalized treatment by our staff of licensed physicians, nurses and counselors, and the physician and patient are able to develop an initial treatment plan tailored specifically for them.

Myth 3: MAT is a short-term treatment only.

MAT is not a one-size-fits-all type of treatment. Every patient who comes through BHG’s doors receives a course of treatment that is specifically tailored to their needs. Treatment plans can vary in length and are based on the individual patient’s history, assessment and long- and short-term goals for recovery.[4] SAMHSA recommends a phased approach to MAT, taking patients through the stages of induction, stabilization, maintenance and tapering.[5] Each case is unique, and the time in treatment will depend on the length and intensity of the patient’s substance use disorder and their ability to adopt the behavioral changes necessary to break the addiction.

Myth 4: Inpatient rehab is better for OUD treatment than outpatient.

When it comes to accessibility, outpatient treatment is much more affordable than most inpatient treatment programs, and allows patients to maintain a more normal daily routine.[6] Patients in an outpatient setting also get the benefit of the support and resources that are fostered within a treatment environment – including treatment for severe withdrawal symptoms, which are often unaddressed in inpatient treatment – while practicing learned strategies within the context of their existing community and responsibilities, an important step for long-term success.[7]

All BHG centers provide treatment in an outpatient setting, which allows patients to receive treatment while still living a normal life, continuing to live at home and carry on with their responsibilities at work or school. All patients receive the structure and responsibility of a treatment program, including both scheduled and unscheduled drug tests, which can help serve as guides to an individual patient’s needs in their progress toward sobriety. Another key benefit is that patients work directly with their doctor and treatment team, allowing them to feel like they’re not alone in their recovery, but part of a team – a team with one, unified goal: the patient’s recovery and ability to take back their own life. While inpatient treatment may be appropriate for some people, outpatient treatment includes structured treatment, counseling services and medical support while also offering the additional advantages of continued employment, interaction with family, and often less expense.

Myth 5: People don’t need treatment until they hit rock bottom.

Treatment does not need to be a last resort. If opioid use is impacting your life, treatment may be an option. Addiction is a chronic but treatable disease, and a tailored treatment plan with the support of physicians, counselors and licensed clinicians can give patients the support they need to take their lives back. Even if you feel your problem with opioids may not be severe enough to enter treatment, we encourage you to get help before your opioid use disorder worsens.

 

Moving past the myths and stigma around opioid treatment is an important step in breaking down barriers to recovery. Our treatment programs help people living with addiction take back their lives by building on their strengths, treating them with respect and dignity, and supporting them in their pursuit of a better quality of life.

You can learn more about our treatment model and centers on our FAQ page, and if you’re seeking treatment for opioid addiction for yourself or a loved one, we encourage you to schedule a consultation.

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We’ve outlined the common medications used In medication-assisted treatment (MAT), which combines counseling and behavioral therapies with medication to provide a “whole-patient” approach to the treatment of substance use disorders including opioid use disorder (OUD), alcohol use disorder and smoking.[i] MAT is the standard of care. The National Institute on Drug Abuse, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other agencies emphasize MAT as the first-line treatment for OUD.[ii]

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved three medications to treat OUD — methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone. These medications help people living with addiction manage cravings and reduce withdrawal symptoms so they can actively work on their recovery.

 

Methadone

Methadone is a long-acting full opioid agonist. It attaches to the same brain receptors as short-acting opioid painkillers or heroin but without producing the more dramatic highs and lows that occur when opioids are abused. This helps relieve the patient’s physiological opioid craving and normalizes the body’s metabolic and hormonal functioning that was impaired by the use of illicit opioids. In addition, methadone diminishes the euphoric effects of other opioids, leaving the patient with little desire to abuse illicit street drugs.

Methadone maintenance therapy is much like using “The Patch” or nicotine gum to quit smoking. Cigarette smokers are addicted to nicotine. It is exceedingly difficult to quit smoking by going “cold turkey.” So, instead, many people use “The Patch” or nicotine gum to regulate and control their nicotine cravings while they learn to live without cigarettes. Eventually, they are weaned off of the nicotine replacement and are able to live completely cigarette- and nicotine-free. Methadone treatment is akin to “The Patch” for persons with opioid dependence — methadone regulates and controls their cravings while they learn to live without drugs and abandon the harmful lifestyle that accompanies drug use. The only difference between a nicotine addiction and an opioid addiction is the substance abused.

Methadone can only be administered in highly regulated opioid treatment programs (OTPs), such as those run by BHG. Unlike illicit drug use, when methadone is taken as prescribed, it is safe and effective. Long-term administration causes no direct damaging effects to the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, blood, bones, brain, or other vital body organs. Some mild side effects may arise during the initial phase of treatment, but they usually subside or disappear as the patient’s dosage is adjusted and stabilized, or when simple medication interventions are initiated.

FDA-approved methadone products for OUD treatment include[iii]:
  • Dolophine (methadone hydrochloride) tablets
  • Methadose (methadone hydrochloride) oral concentrate

Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist, meaning it binds to the opioid receptors in the brain, but activates them less strongly than full agonists like methadone or illicit opioids. This means it can reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms without the dramatic highs and lows of illicit drug abuse. It is available either on its own or in combination with naloxone[iv], which further reduces the ability of a person to get “high” while using the medication. It is typically regarded as being effective for less advanced or severe substance use disorder but may not be as effective as Methadone for more severe cases such as IV (intravenous) opiate and Heroin use.

Buprenorphine treatment is most typically provided via physician office practices and in OTPs, such as the clinics BHG operates. We offer buprenorphine in some of our facilities for patients who may want to start with that option. In areas where we do not provide buprenorphine as an adjunct therapy, we work with non-OTP providers (who are limited to working only with buprenorphine in an office-based setting) on a referral basis, as we believe in trying to get each patient into the treatment that is most appropriate for them.

FDA-approved buprenorphine products for OUD treatment include[v]:
  • Bunavail (buprenorphine and naloxone) buccal film
  • Cassipa (buprenorphine and naloxone) sublingual film
  • Probuphine (buprenorphine) implant for subdermal administration
  • Sublocade (buprenorphine extended‐release) injection for subcutaneous use
  • Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone) sublingual film for sublingual or buccal use, or sublingual tablet.
  • Subutex (buprenorphine) sublingual tablet
  • Zubsolv (buprenorphine and naloxone) sublingual tablets

Naltrexone

Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist, meaning that it blocks the activation of opioid receptors. This decreases cravings and prevents any opioid drug from producing a “high,” however, it does not relieve opioid withdrawal symptoms. Naltrexone is given as a long-acting injectable, meaning its effects last for weeks. According to the National Institute for Drug Abuse, this makes naltrexone “a good option for patients who do not have ready access to health care or who struggle with taking their medications regularly.”[vi]

FDA-approved naltrexone products for OUD treatment include[vii]:
  • Vivitrol (naltrexone for extended-release injectable suspension) intramuscular

What about Narcan?

Narcan is a brand name of naloxone, an opioid antagonist. This is not a treatment for opioid addiction; rather, it is used in acute situations to reverse opioid overdose. You can learn more about naloxone on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s website.

 

Ultimately, medication-assisted treatment uses a combination of medication, such as those outlined above, social support services, as well as counseling to provide a comprehensive approach to treatment – one that allows patients to return to productive lives within their families, jobs and communities. Medication-assisted treatment can help patients overcome one of the largest obstacles in opioid addiction – managing the physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms – and when it’s complimented with personalized counseling and social services, this course of treatment has decades of evidence demonstrating its effectiveness and is considered the gold standard of care.

If you or a loved one are seeking treatment for opioid addiction, please contact us.

 

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As of January 1, 2020, opioid addiction treatment is 100% covered for Original Medicare beneficiaries at all Behavioral Health Group (BHG) centers—the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the U.S. For the first time in history, BHG’s comprehensive opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment, which includes all FDA-approved OUD medications and counseling services, are available with no out-of-pocket costs to anyone who has Medicare Part B coverage.

“We have been working tirelessly with patient groups, treatment advocates and government leaders to see this day come to pass,” said Jay Higham, President & CEO of BHG. “Thanks to the leadership of Congress and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the 300,000 Medicare beneficiaries living with OUD can finally access opioid treatment programs, which provide the most comprehensive and effective evidence-based treatment options available.”

In addition to FDA-approved OUD medications – methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone – Medicare-insured BHG patients with Medicare Part B will have access to counseling, behavioral therapy, and wraparound support provided by opioid treatment programs (OTPs).

Medicare is the largest federal government-sponsored health insurance program, providing coverage for more than 60 million older people and younger people with disabilities. The Medicare-age population has among the highest and fastest-growing rates of diagnosed opioid use disorder. In October 2018, the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment (SUPPORT) for Patients and Communities Act became law, which helped close a significant gap in opioid treatment by mandating coverage of OTPs under Medicare Part B effective January 1, 2020.

Prior to the law, more than 1,600 opioid treatment centers were not covered by Medicare despite offering the same, and sometimes more comprehensive, services as other treatment locations. OTPs, which must be certified by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administrations (SAMHSA) and accredited by an independent, SAMHSA-approved accrediting body to dispense medications, are the only type of opioid treatment provider to offer all three FDA-approved medications and counseling services onsite.

BHG is working to contract with Medicare Advantage plans, which do not have to cover OTPs in the same manner as the original, traditional fee-for-service Medicare program. Some Medicare Advantage plans may not waive the co-pay like Original Medicare.

About BHG

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is the largest network of Joint Commission-accredited outpatient opioid treatment and recovery centers in the U.S., delivering comprehensive, personalized evidence-based medical and behavioral therapies for individuals with opioid use disorder. With 60 locations in 14 states, BHG has more than 1,000 employees who serve more than 18,000 patients. To learn more, visit bhgrecovery.com.

by Dr. Christopher Marshall

As we watch our country reckon with the results of the opioid epidemic, Tennesseans don’t have to look far to see the grave effects on families and communities. Almost 2,000 Tennesseans died due to opioid overdoses in 2018 according to CDC statistics released earlier this year—sadly, a record high for the state.

While Tennessee has made great strides in recent years to address the opioid crisis, this sobering number shows that greater support is needed to reverse the trend—most importantly, we need to ensure that Tennesseans have access to evidence-based opioid addiction treatment.

Opioid addiction, or opioid use disorder (OUD), is unique from other substance use disorders. As one consumes an increasing amount of opioids, the body gradually adjusts to the elevated levels. When an individual with severe OUD quits cold turkey, the body goes through such painful withdrawal that relapse is common. When a person relapses, he/she often takes a high dose that their body is no longer able to tolerate, often resulting in an overdose or even death.

Counteracting the destructive effects of OUD requires a comprehensive treatment protocol that combines medication with counseling and behavioral therapies. Known as medication-assisted treatment (MAT), this approach is proven to reduce the risk of recidivism and death for patients with OUD. Historically, the key barriers to care for many Tennesseans has been cost and lack of insurance coverage.

Thankfully the federal government and Tennessee have taken significant steps to help increase patient access to evidence-based treatment. To help prevent opioid overdose deaths in the state, Tennessee has mandated prescriber education, implemented opioid prescribing guidelines, increased access to naloxone and reinstated coverage of methadone, an FDA-approved drug for OUD treatment, among many other measures over the years.

Currently, the state is working to implement mandates from the federal SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act that was passed into law in the fall of 2018. The legislation requires that Medicaid cover all forms of MAT—including FDA-approved drugs, counseling and behavioral therapy—beginning in October 2020. Tennessee is actively working with key stakeholders to optimize this newly mandated Medicaid funding to ensure residents have access to MAT without short-sighted and harmful restrictions, such as dosage limits, preauthorization and step therapies.

As the state expands its Medicaid services to combat this crisis, TennCare is also exploring coverage of wraparound services, such as vocational training, peer and caregiver support, housing assistance, childcare and educational programs. These soft supports help keep patients committed to their recovery journey. With these services, patients are more likely to achieve long-term success by working closely with a care team to meet individualized milestones, like securing a job or re-attaining custody of children.

Some of the largest private insurers of Tennessee are also recognizing the importance of MAT and have been expanding coverage of treatment for its members. We are encouraged by these efforts and hope that this shift continues so that more Tennesseans have access to this life-saving treatment.

The complexities of OUD treatment make a one-size-fits-all approach impossible. Both large private insurers and public insurers like TennCare are recognizing that OUD, like other chronic diseases, requires long-term treatment and support to maintain recovery. The entire addiction treatment community is hopeful that Tennessee’s incoming MAT coverage is meaningful and without barriers to access for the most vulnerable populations.

Read the full article here.

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If you are seeking more information on opioid use disorder treatment for yourself or a loved one, please visit BHGrecovery.com or call 844-535-7291 for resources and support.

Dr. Christopher Marshall is the National Medical Director at Behavioral Health Group (BHG), where he provides leadership and guidance to support BHG’s mission to improve patient access to comprehensive opioid treatment. Dr. Marshall currently provides care for BHG patients in West Tennessee.

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is continuing its commitment to bring industry leading opioid addiction treatment to Alabama through the purchase of the its newest location in Mobile. With the acquisition of Escape from Chemical Dependence in Mobile, BHG now operates 6 opioid addiction treatment centers in Alabama. “We are excited to bring the resources and operational expertise of BHG in support of the great work already being done by the team in Mobile. This acquisition is a key part of our efforts to continue the fight against the opioid epidemic across the great state of Alabama,” said Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer for BHG. The BHG Mobile Treatment Center is located at 808 Downtowner Loop W, Mobile, AL 36609.

About Behavioral Health Group:

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading outpatient opioid addiction treatment provider with the understanding that opioid use disorder is a chronic brain disease, not a moral failure. BHG offers medication-assisted treatment which utilizes a combination of FDA approved medications along with counseling and behavioral interventions to treat opioid addiction. In addressing both the physical and behavioral aspects of addiction, patients are given the best opportunity for a successful recovery. With over 50 treatment locations across 13 states, BHG provides services to thousands of individuals and their communities.

For more information, or if you or someone you know is looking for help with opioid addiction, please call 844-535-7291, or visit bhgrecovery.com.

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) has completed the acquisition of its sixth treatment center location in Virginia. Formerly River City Comprehensive Counseling Services, the BHG Glen Allen Treatment Center is located at 13100 Mountain Road, Glen Allen, VA 23059. With a proven track record of providing evidence-based treatment, Behavioral Health Group is continuing its commitment to tackling the opioid epidemic in Virginia. “With a strong unmet need for opioid addiction treatment in Virginia, we look forward to building off of the great work already being done by the team in Glen Allen to expand access to treatment and high quality care for patients,” said Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer for BHG.

Behavioral Health Group is a leading outpatient opioid addiction treatment provider. Understanding that opioid use disorder is a chronic brain disease, not a moral failure, BHG’s team of physicians, medical professionals and counselors provide comprehensive treatment to help patients take their lives back. BHG offers Medication-Assisted Treatment which utilizes a combination of FDA approved medications along with counseling and behavioral interventions to treat opioid addiction. “Studies consistently show that Medication-Assisted Treatment along with counseling decreases illicit opioid use,” said Dr. Chris Marshall, Chief Medicaid Director for BHG.  “We must continue to focus on increasing access to treatment as well as prevention.”

BHG currently operates 54 treatment locations across 13 states. BHG treatment centers are accredited by The Joint Commission. For more information about Behavioral Health Group and the treatment services offered, visit bhgrecovery.com.


For Business Development Information:
Dwight Mussleman
Dwight.Mussleman@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6114

Media Contact:
Joshua Wright
Joshua.wright@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6146

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is pleased to announce they are now accepting Cigna Behavioral Health Insurance at all Tennessee treatment locations. “Behavioral Health Group is excited to be a provider in Cigna Behavioral Health’s network, enabling their members to access this critical benefit. Patients all over Tennessee are immediately responding to this welcomed enhancement to our spectrum of insurance offerings”, said Derek Walsh, Senior Vice President of Operations for BHG. “These patients will be receiving lifesaving treatment, from highly qualified addiction specialist, in an individualized manner designed to support their recovery.”

Behavioral Health Group is a leading outpatient opioid addiction treatment provider with the understanding that opioid use disorder is a chronic brain disease, not a moral failure. Behavioral Health Group offers medication-assisted treatment which utilizes a combination of FDA approved medication along with counseling and behavioral interventions to treat opioid addiction. Although, medication-assisted treatment has proven to be the most effective form of treatment for opioid use disorder, many individuals have been unable to access this form of treatment due to a lack of insurance coverage options. “We are very excited to be working as a provider in Cigna Behavioral Health’s network in Tennessee. This is a huge benefit for patients with mental health and addiction problems as it will allow more affordable and comprehensive access to the care they need,” said Dr. Christopher Marshall, National Medical Director for BHG.

Behavioral Health Group currently operates 54 treatment locations across the country, including 10 treatment centers in the state of Tennessee. Tennessee treatment locations include Knoxville, Memphis, Nashville, Jackson, Columbia, Dyersburg and Paris Tennessee. For more information about treatment and to see if you may have eligible benefit coverage call 844-535-7291 or visit bhgrecovey.com.


For Business Development Information:
Dwight Mussleman
Dwight.Mussleman@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6114

Media Contact:
Joshua Wright
Joshua.wright@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6146

Behavioral Health Group (BHG), a leading provider in outpatient opioid addiction treatment, has acquired what was formerly the Good Hope Institute in Washington, D.C. The BHG Washington, D.C., Treatment Center is located at 1320 Good Hope Road SE, Washington, D.C. 20020. “BHG is pleased to be able to serve the needs of the patients in the Washington, D.C., area.  This strategic acquisition expands BHG’s footprint into the Northern Virginia area and allows BHG to continue the fight against this national epidemic,” said Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer for BHG.

With one of the highest rates of opioid overdose deaths in the country, the need for effective treatment in the district is clear. Behavioral Health Group will work to utilize its resources and expertise to build upon the great work and team already in place at the Washington, D.C., location. Behavioral Health Group offers medication-assisted treatment (MAT), which is considered the gold standard of care for opioid use disorder. Medication-assisted treatment combines the use of FDA approved medications along with counseling services to provide comprehensive care for individuals struggling with opioid addiction. “Research has shown that medication-assisted treatment decreases illicit opioid use, improves overall health and gets people back to their normal lives,” said Dr. Christopher Marshall, National Medical Director for BHG.

The Behavioral Health Group Washington, D.C., Treatment Center accepts Medicaid and is currently enrolling new patients. If you or someone you know is struggling with opioid addiction give us a call at 202-610-1886. For more information about opioid addiction and the treatment services provided by Behavioral Health Group you can also visit bhgrecovery.com.


For Business Development Information:
Dwight Mussleman
Dwight.Mussleman@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6114

Media Contact:
Joshua Wright
Joshua.wright@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6146

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is continuing its commitment of providing high quality treatment for opioid addiction in the state of Alabama with the addition of the BHG Cullman Treatment Center. BHG now operates five addiction treatment centers in Alabama and is one of the leading treatment providers in the state. “We are grateful for the opportunity to increase our role in providing high quality care for opioid-use disorder to the community of Cullman and across the entire state of Alabama,” said Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer of BHG.

While the Cullman Treatment Center is the most recent addition to the BHG treatment center network, BHG has added four other locations in the state within the past year. BHG’s first Alabama treatment center was in Tuscaloosa in November of 2017. Since then, BHG has acquired locations in Sheffield, Bessemer, Gadsden and now Cullman. “Opioid-use disorder continues to afflict communities across the country, including those of Alabama. While this public health crisis presents significant challenges, we at BHG know that opioid addiction is treatable. Through evidence-based programs such as Medication Assisted Treatment, along with counseling, successful recovery is possible,” said Jay Higham, CEO of BHG.

Along with counseling, BHG offers Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), the gold standard of care for opioid addiction. MAT utilizes the combination of FDA approved medication with counseling and other support service for a comprehensive treatment approach to addiction. Dr. Chris Marshall, National Medical director for BHG, talks about the importance of this comprehensive approach, “The U.S. has almost lost an entire generation in the workforce. Studies consistently show that Medication Assisted Treatment and counseling decrease illicit opioid use, improve overall health and get people back to their normal lives.”

The BHG Cullman Treatment Center is located at 1912 Commerce Avenue Northwest, Cullman, AL, and is now accepting new patients. Additionally, BHG Cullman Treatment Center will be joining the four other BHG Alabama locations in accepting Medicaid effective January 2019. For more information please visit bhgrecovery.com or call 844-535-7291.


BHG Alabama Locations:

BHG Bessemer Treatment Center
4204 Edmonton Dr, Bessemer, AL 35022

BHG Cullman Treatment Center
1912 Commerce Ave NW, Cullman, AL 35055

BHG Gadsden Treatment Center
1121 Gardner Street, Gadsden, AL 35901

BHG Shoals Treatment Center
3430 North Jackson Highway, Sheffield, AL 35660

BHG Tuscaloosa Treatment Center
1001 Mimosa Park Rd, Tuscaloosa, AL 35405


For Business Development Information:
Dwight Mussleman
Dwight.Mussleman@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6114

Media Contact:
Joshua Wright
Joshua.wright@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6146

BHG Nashville Counselor Supervisor, Annie Battley, recently participated as a panelist at the Medication Assisted Treatment Conference hosted by the Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse on September 24, 2018. Speaking on the Combined Learning Panel, Annie fielded questions by attendees and discussed the importance of integrated care for patients struggling with substance abuse issues. Other important topics discussed by the panel included education about the role of counseling and support services within medication-assisted treatment as well as the need to continue efforts in destigmatizing addiction by recognizing addiction as a disease that can be treated rather than a moral failure. Fellow panelist included Stephen Loyd, M.D. and Erica Schlesinger, PharmD. The panel was moderated by Paul Fuchar, Executive Director for CADAS.

Speaking about her experience on the panel, Annie said, “It was an honor to be sitting alongside so many distinguished people in the addiction and MAT community. I believe the audience, myself included, walked away with a better understanding of the importance of integrated care for the addiction population.” Annie represented BHG well and we are grateful that she was able to contribute to this important dialogue.

For more information about Medication Assisted Treatment and services offered by BHG please visit https://bhgrecovery.com/treatment-services/.

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is increasing its presence in Virginia with the addition of BHG Franklin Treatment Center.  With existing treatment centers located in Chesapeake, Newport News and Virginia Beach, BHG Franklin represents the fourth opioid addiction treatment center in the state for BHG. “Our mission is to expand access to evidence-based treatment for addiction to the underserved areas in the state. The addition of BHG Franklin is a key part of that effort and provides an opportunity to build on the great work that has already been started by the team here,” said Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer for BHG.

As the opioid crisis continues to ravage the communities of Virginia, there is a critical need for access to proven treatment. BHG offers medication-assisted treatment, a combination of FDA approved medication and counseling that has become known as the “gold standard” of care for treatment of opioid addiction. “Research shows that medication-assisted treatment and counseling decrease illicit opioid use, improve overall health and get people back to their normal lives. We must focus on treatment for the people and families currently struggling with this problem, as well as prevention,” said Dr. Christopher Marshall, National Medical Director for BHG.

The Behavioral Health Group Franklin Treatment Center is located at 1333 Carrsville Highway, Franklin, VA, and is now accepting new patients. In addition to self-pay plans, BHG Franklin also accepts Anthem Medicaid. For more information please visit franklin.bhgrecovery.com or call 757-304-9857.

About Behavioral Health Group:

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading outpatient opioid addiction treatment provider with the understanding that opioid use disorder is a chronic brain disease, not a moral failure. BHG offers medication-assisted treatment which utilizes a combination of FDA approved medications along with counseling and behavioral interventions to treat opioid addiction. In addressing both the physical and psychosocial aspects of addiction, patients are given the best opportunity for a successful recovery. With 50 treatment locations across 11 states, BHG provides services to thousands of individuals and their communities. BHG Treatment Centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

For Business Development Information:
Dwight Mussleman
Dwight.Mussleman@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6114

Media Contact:
Joshua Wright
Joshua.wright@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6146

Seeing a friend or family member struggle with opioid addiction is an extremely difficult and frustrating experience. It my create feelings of helplessness, heartbreak and anger. Despite your best efforts, it may feel like nothing you do helps. Setting boundaries and deciding how far to extend oneself can be difficult and is a personal decision for each individual to make. However, one thing that we should always do is keep in mind that opioid addiction is a brain disease, not a moral failure. Understanding this allows us to deal with the situation for what it is, a complex medical issue with mental, physical and social components. This is why, as frustrating as it may be, a loved one is unlikely to be able to stop using opioids on their own through sheer willpower. Opioids effect brain chemistry by blocking pain signals and flooding the reward system of the brain with dopamine. The absence of these opioids in the system can cause severe withdrawal symptoms. Over time, individuals may develop a tolerance and need more and more opioids just to feel normal. You can learn more about how opioids work and why they are so hard to quit here.

The good news is that there is hope for your loved one in the form of proven treatment for opioid addiction. Through Medication-Assisted Treatment individuals have the opportunity to take their lives back from opioids. Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) utilizes medications in combination with counseling services to provide a comprehensive treatment program. In fact, research shows that Medication-Assisted Treatment is the most effective form of treatment for opioid use disorder.

Equipped with the knowledge that opioid addiction is a brain disease, not a moral failure, we are able to view addiction with more empathy and more realistic expectations about treatment needs. While the choice to seek help and stick with a recovery program is ultimately up to the individual, if you want to encourage a loved one to seek treatment, suggest they consider a program that offers Medication-Assisted Treatment as an option. With over 40 locations across 11 states, there may be a BHG treatment center near you. If so, give us a call at 844-535-7291 and we would be happy to discuss our treatment options with you or your loved one. You can also visit our Treatment Services page to learn more about our treatment programs.

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is pleased to announce the opening of a new treatment facility in Berea, Kentucky. The new BHG Berea Treatment Center is located at 1000 Ace Drive, Berea, KY 40403. “With our seventh location in the state, we are increasing our commitment to tackling the opioid crisis in Kentucky and we are looking forward to continuing to serve the communities of Madison County with this new location,” said Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer of BHG.
As part of a comprehensive approach to opioid addiction treatment, the services offered at BHG Berea include physician exams, counseling, medication dosing and lab testing. “Studies consistently show that medication-assisted treatment and counseling decrease illicit opioid use, improve overall health and get people back to their normal lives,” said Dr. Chris Marshall, National Medical Director of BHG. “We must now focus on treatment for the people and families currently struggling with this problem, as well as prevention. Behavioral Health Group is leading the way to get people the help they need with a time tested and structured program that helps people get their lives back.”
BHG will be hosting an open house on July 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for community members to come and get a first-hand look at the treatment center, meet the treatment team and learn more about the services that BHG provides.

About Behavioral Health Group
Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading outpatient opioid addiction treatment provider with the understanding that opioid use disorder is a chronic brain disease, not a moral failure. BHG offers medication-assisted treatment which utilizes a combination of FDA approved medications along with counseling and behavioral interventions to treat opioid addiction. In addressing both the physical and psychosocial aspects of addiction, patients are given the best opportunity for a successful recovery. With 48 treatment locations across 11 states, BHG provides services to thousands of individuals and their communities. BHG Treatment Centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

If you or someone you know is looking for help with opioid addiction, please call at 844-535-7291, or visit bhgrecovery.com.

For Business Development Information:
Dwight Mussleman
Dwight.Mussleman@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6114

Media Contact:
Joshua Wright
Joshua.wright@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6146

BHG Acquires Third Location in Virginia with Newport News Treatment Center

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) recently completed the latest acquisition of a treatment center in Newport News, VA. BHG Newport News now represents the third location for the company in the state of Virginia. “We are very committed to serving the community in Southeast Virginia and we look forward to building on the great team already in place here,” said Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer for BHG.

Virginia continues to struggle with an unmet need and demand for proven opioid addiction treatment services. BHG will immediately work to leverage its resources and operational experience to expand services and access to medication-assisted treatment, the gold standard for opioid use disorder treatment. “Opioid overdose related deaths continue to rise throughout the United States despite a decrease in the amount of prescriptions written for these substances. Heroin and illicit Fentanyl are becoming catastrophic problems,” Said Dr. Christopher Marshall, National Medical Director for BHG. “Behavioral Health Group is leading the way to get people the help they need with a time tested and structured program that helps people get their lives back.”

About BHG

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading outpatient opioid addiction treatment provider. Understanding that opioid use disorder is a chronic brain disease, not a moral failure, BHG offers Medication-Assisted Treatment which utilizes a combination of FDA approved medications along with counseling and behavioral interventions to treat opioid addiction. In addressing both the physical and psychosocial aspects of addiction, patients are given the best opportunity for a successful recovery.

BHG Treatment Centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

For Business Development Information:
Dwight Mussleman
Dwight.Mussleman@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6114

Media Contact:
Joshua Wright
Joshua.wright@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6146

Increasing the accessibility of opioid addiction treatment is a primary commitment of Behavioral Health Group (BHG). In support of that effort, BHG is excited to announce we are now accepting certain types of health insurance in Tennessee. Many individuals are not aware that they may have substance abuse coverage as part of their plan. With insurance through your employer, or if you have a private policy, you may have coverage that could significantly reduce your out-of-pocket cost for treatment. Give BHG a call today to verify your benefits or to schedule an intake consultation and learn how your insurance can best work for you.

About BHG:

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading outpatient opioid addiction treatment provider. Understanding that opioid use disorder is a chronic brain disease, not a moral failure, BHG’s team of physicians, medical professionals and counselors provide comprehensive treatment to help patients take their lives back. BHG offers Medication-Assisted Treatment which utilizes a combination of FDA approved medications along with counseling and behavioral interventions to treat opioid addiction. In addressing both the physical and psychosocial aspects of addiction, patients are given the best opportunity for a successful recovery. BHG is privileged to serve Tennessee with treatment centers in Columbia, Dyersburg, Jackson, Knoxville, Memphis, Nashville and Paris. BHG Treatment Centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

The Greater West Plains Area Chamber of Commerce has recognized BHG West Plains Treatment Center as “Business of the Week.” Program Director, Tess Miley, pointed to an increase in employment and decrease in criminal activity by BHG patients as just a few examples of the positive impact that BHG is having on the community and the lives of their patients. “BHG provides evidence-based, team-delivered, Medication-Assisted Treatment of opioid dependence allowing each patient to work toward achieving his or her best level of functioning in the community,” Miley said. Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) utilizes a combination of medication, such as methadone or Suboxone, along with counseling to provide comprehensive treatment for opioid-use disorder. Services provided by BHG West Plains are delivered in an outpatient setting. This allows patients to maintain productive lives within their families, jobs and communities.

Across the country, many communities and individuals do not have access to MAT, the gold-standard for opioid addiction treatment. Fortunately, in West Plains, Missouri, that is not the case. Tess Miley, Dr. Michael Stevenson and the entire BHG West Plains treatment team are proud to serve the West Plains community with high quality care for individuals struggling with opioid addiction.  You can learn more about the services provided by BHG West Plains at https://westplains-mo.bhgrecovery.com/, or call 417-257-1833.

View the original article from West Plains Daily Quill here.

While there is still much work to be done in combating America’s opioid epidemic, it is important to recognize where progress has been made. A recent report by the IQVIA INSTITUTE shows that the prescribing of opioids for pain management declined by nearly 8% in 2017. In fact, opioid prescriptions have been declining since they peaked in 2011. Additionally, those who are receiving opioid prescriptions are being prescribed lower dosages and for shorter periods of time than in previous years. Along with an increase in the general awareness of the risk for opioid misuse, the report points out that 24 states have set strict limits on the length and dosage of new opioid prescriptions. It appears that messaging and new guidelines related to the risk of opioid dependence are having a real impact on the prescribing habits of doctors.

At the same time that new opioid prescriptions are declining, Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) participation has seen a significant increase. MAT includes the administration of FDA approved medications along with support services, such as counseling, for a comprehensive approach to treatment. This form of treatment is considered the gold standard of care for opioid use disorder. Since the start of 2016, new prescriptions for the purpose of MAT have nearly doubled. IQVIA’s report credits the rise in new MAT stats, in part, to increased funding for MAT programs.

These trends are certainly encouraging. However, plenty of challenges remain before the tide is likely to turn in our country’s struggle with opioid addiction. The prevalence of opioid prescriptions is still extremely high when compared to historical levels or with other countries. Moreover, despite a recent spike in MAT participation, the vast majority of individuals struggling with opioid addiction are still not receiving the comprehensive care they need.

View the original IQVIA report here: https://www.iqvia.com/institute/reports/medicine-use-and-spending-in-the-us-review-of-2017-outlook-to-2022

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is committed to removing barriers to treatment and providing the best possible care for those struggling with opioid addiction.  We understand that opioid addiction is a chronic brain disease, not a moral failure. BHG provides comprehensive treatment for opioid addiction with over 40 locations across 11 states. We are especially excited for the opportunity to participate in grant programs at our Louisiana, Alabama, North Carolina and Kansas treatment centers. These grant programs allow qualified individuals to receive treatment at no cost.

As the opioid epidemic continues to grow at an alarming rate in America, we are beginning to better understand the role that opioid prescriptions play in contributing to this problem. A recent article from the British Medical Journal titled “Postsurgical prescriptions for opioid naïve patients and association with overdose and misuse: retrospective cohort study” highlights an important issue facing doctors and patients today. This study shows a clear correlation between the length of time a person was prescribed opioids and the likelihood of misuse.

The research outcomes demonstrates that each additional week of prescribed opioid use post-discharge was associated with a 34.2% increase in the rate of misuse. This did not seem to follow the same risk related to the dose. The actual dose prescribed only became important with extended use. My conclusions from this point toward my continued opinion that surgeons and dentist should be very conservative in their postoperative prescribing as there is clear evidence pointing to significant risk of opioid misuse and addiction with prolonged prescriptions.

This study adds to the growing research  that for  for most general procedures surgeons should try to limit prescriptions to one week or less after the procedure or discharge and then provide no more than 1 additional week of post-operative opioid medications without extenuating circumstances. This should help limit new cases of opioid addiction developing and strengthen the push to more non-narcotic methods of pain relief.

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading provider of opioid addiction treatment services in Louisiana and nationwide. BHG is pleased to have recently completed their relocation from South Johnson Street to 2235 Poydras Street, Suite B, New Orleans, Louisiana 70119. With expanded dosing windows, more counseling offices and multiple waiting rooms, the new location has been fully renovated and optimized for the best possible patient experience. “The new BHG Downtown New Orleans location is one of the largest sites in the network of BHG treatment centers and is currently serving many individuals and families from Orleans Parish and beyond. With a new state of the art medical facility and a top notch clinical staff, patients receive the highest quality care when enrolled in treatment, as well as access to other services through community collaboration and referrals,” said Amanda Karistai, Regional Director of BHG.

The new facility adds over 2,000 square feet of space and provides substantial room for growth by more than doubling the potential patient capacity. This increased capacity for treatment couldn’t come too soon for a community and state that has been hit hard by the opioid crisis. From 2012 to 2016, heroin overdose deaths increased from 51 to 149 deaths and synthetic opioid-related deaths increased from 19 to 89 annually in Louisiana alone (NIDA, 2018). “Substance use disorder has rapidly become one of New Orleans’ most significant issues – one that must be addressed immediately and quickly. Medication-assisted treatment is evidence-based and the gold standard of treatment for individuals addicted to opiates. Through the services provided at Behavioral Health Group, individuals receive medical assessments and referrals, engage in counseling services, and are provided the tools necessary to become stable and resume normal living, all while decreasing the risk associated with illegal opiates,” said Dr. Daniel Bouchette, Medical Director for BHG Downtown New Orleans. “BHG welcomes individuals in all stages of life and guarantees patient-centered care. We are proud to have increased access to treatment in this area with the expansion of our Downtown New Orleans location.”

The team at BHG is paving the way for high quality treatment for individuals addicted to opioids, reflected in the organization’s recent development and investment in the greater New Orleans area. For more information about the treatment services provided at BHG Downtown New Orleans call 504-524-7205, or visit https://new-orleans-downtown.bhgrecovery.com/.

Media Contact:
Joshua Wright
Joshua.wright@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6146

For Business Development Information:
Dwight Mussleman
Dwight.Mussleman@bhgrecovery.com
214-365-6114

 

Behavioral Health Group Launches Second Opioid Addiction Treatment Center in Springfield, Missouri

Responding to the continued public health crisis of opioid addiction, Behavioral Health Group, LLC (BHG) announced today the opening of an addiction treatment center in Springfield, Missouri.

Drug overdose deaths in the United States exceeded 52,000 in 2015 and now claim more lives than automobile accidents.  The majority of those deaths are a result of opioid drugs including prescription pain medication and heroin.

“Opioid addiction continues to ravage communities across the United States,” said Jay Higham, Chief Executive Officer of BHG. “Our Company’s mission is to expand access to evidence-based treatment in underserved markets across the United States.  With this new location, BHG now operates two full service opioid addiction treatment centers in the greater Springfield area and eight in all of Missouri.”

BHG adheres to a multidisciplinary approach to addiction treatment, which includes the use of medications indicated for opioid addiction treatment, including Methadone, Suboxone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy, to treat the biochemical aspect of addiction along with counseling to address psychosocial influences.  The Company’s approach to treatment is individualized under physician supervision in an outpatient setting.  Early in treatment patients visit the treatment center daily to receive medication and counseling.  As treatment progresses and the patient achieves greater medical and psychosocial stability the frequency of visits to the treatment center are reduced.

“The first 90 days are critical,” said Dr. Mark Carlson, Medical Director of Springfield and North Springfield Treatment Centers.  “During that time we work hard to ensure the patient is responding well to the medication and improving in their lives.  For patients in treatment for 90 days, we have excellent results as measured by almost all objective criteria – abstinence from drug use, improvements in employment, family dynamics and general well-being.”

In Missouri, BHG Treatment Centers are working to participate with most major medical insurance programs that cover addiction treatment.  The Company’s objective is to improve access to treatment for those struggling with addiction and recognizes that participating with third party payers is an important component of that objective.

View the original article here.

Behavioral Health Group Launches Opioid Addiction Treatment Center in Centennial, CO

Responding to the continued public health crisis of opioid addiction, Behavioral Health Group, LLC (BHG) announced today the opening of an addiction treatment center in Centennial, Colorado.

Drug overdose deaths in the United States exceeded 52,000 in 2015 and now claim more lives than automobile accidents.  The majority of those deaths are a result of opioid drugs including prescription pain medication and heroin.

“Opioid addiction continues to ravage communities across the United States,” said Jay Higham, Chief Executive Officer of BHG. “Our Company’s mission is to expand access to evidence-based treatment in underserved markets across the United States.  With this new location, BHG now operates five full service opioid addiction treatment centers in the greater Denver area – Downtown Denver, Westminster, Longmont, Fort Collins and Centennial.”

BHG adheres to a multidisciplinary approach to addiction treatment, which includes the use of medications indicated for opioid addiction treatment, including Suboxone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy, to treat the biochemical aspect of addiction along with counseling to address psychosocial influences.  The Company’s approach to treatment is individualized under physician supervision in an outpatient setting.  Early in treatment patients visit the treatment center daily to receive medication and counseling.  As treatment progresses and the patient achieves greater medical and psychosocial stability the frequency of visits to the treatment center are reduced.

“The first 90 days are critical,” said Dr. Amir Eissa, Medical Director of BHG Westminster and Centennial.  “During that time we work hard to ensure the patient is responding well to the medication and improving in their lives.  For patients in treatment for 90 days, we have excellent results as measured by almost all objective criteria – abstinence from drug use, improvements in employment, family dynamics and general well-being.”

In Colorado, BHG Treatment Centers are active participants with the State Medicaid program.  The Company is also working to participate with most major medical insurance programs that cover addiction treatment.  The Company’s objective is to improve access to treatment for those struggling with addiction and recognizes that participating with third party payers is an important component of that objective.

View the original article here.

Behavioral Health Group Acquires Two Addiction Treatment Programs in Georgia

Behavioral Health Group, LLC (BHG) announced today the acquisition of two addiction treatment programs in Tifton and Albany, Georgia.

“Opioid addiction continues to ravage communities across the United States,” said Jay Higham, Chief Executive Officer of BHG. “Our Company’s mission is to expand access to evidence-based treatment in underserved markets across the United States.  The addition of Private Clinic Albany and TLC Clinic of Tifton represents an opportunity to partner with a high quality provider of addiction services and to expand access to even more people in Georgia.”

“We are pleased to welcome all the stakeholders of these two treatment centers to BHG,” said Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer of BHG.  “For patients, we expect to improve access to treatment by participating with Georgia Medicaid once we get through the contracting process with the State.  For teammates, we will provide the Company’s full support including sufficient staffing, modern information systems, regulatory compliance and training and access to capital for expanded services.”

“It was important to me to leave my treatment centers in the hands of a company that will provide the resources necessary to support continued growth and development,” said  Jonathan Connell, President of Private Clinic Albany and TLC Clinic of Tifton.  “With any transition like this, patients and employees are nervous about what this means for them.  BHG managed the transaction very professionally and ensured that there were no disruptions to patient care or undue anxiety for staff, both of which were important to me.”

View the original article here.

Behavioral Health Group Acquires Two Addiction Treatment Programs in Virginia

Behavioral Health Group, LLC (BHG) announced today the acquisition of two addiction treatment programs in Chesapeake and Virginia Beach, Virginia.

“Opioid addiction has reached epidemic proportions in the US,” said Jay Higham, Chief Executive Officer of BHG. “We believe addiction is a brain disease and that the most effective approach to therapy is through a comprehensive, individualized treatment plan utilizing medication and intensive counseling.  We are very excited by the opportunity to bring our treatment philosophy to Virginia and the larger mid-Atlantic marketplace.”

“We are pleased to welcome our new colleagues to BHG,” said Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer of BHG.  “A fundamental component of BHG’s strategy is to develop a regional platform whereby BHG can leverage resources to better serve communities and patients. The addition of these two treatment centers is the next step in our national expansion plans.”

The previous owners of the treatment centers are happy that BHG will continue a patient-centric philosophy by offering individuals personalized treatment in accordance with best practices.  “It was important to us to transfer our treatment centers to a company that is focused on quality care and that has a passion and genuine concern for our patients,” stated Judd Mendelson, Chief Executive Offer and partner in Affinity Health Group.  “In addition, BHG made the sales process very easy and we would recommend them to any treatment center owner looking to sell.”

View original article here.

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Expands Services in Fort Collins, Colorado

Today, Behavioral Health Group, LLC (BHG) announced the expansion of services in its Fort Collins, Colorado treatment center.  Historically, the BHG Fort Collins Medication Unit, located at 2114 Midpoint Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80525, has been a satellite of BHG’s Longmont Treatment Center. However, beginning today, BHG will begin offering patients its full array of opioid addiction services. In addition to medication-assisted treatment, services will include physician exams, admissions, counseling and lab testing.

“We are pleased to be able to expand our services in Fort Collins,” said Jay Higham, Chief Executive Officer of BHG. “Fort Collins is now BHG’s fourth full-service treatment center in Colorado, and we are pleased to be able to serve patients and communities here.”

Tina Beckley, BHG’s Colorado Regional Director, added: “Our full-service opioid treatment program in Fort Collins will serve patients in the northern and rural counties as well as Southern Wyoming.  Our Fort Collins Treatment Center will join our treatment centers in Longmont, Westminster and Denver, Colorado in providing quality and patient-centered care.”

View the original article here.

U.S. Surgeon General Visits Behavioral Health Group Knoxville Treatment Center

KNOXVILLE, Tenn., June 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — In an effort to combat the ever growing rates of opioid addiction in America, the U.S. Surgeon General has launched a multi-faceted campaign to help “Turn the Tide” and roll back the devastating toll on families and communities across the country.

Through a combination of educating prescribers about the opioid epidemic and mobilizing them to improve prescribing practices, the U.S. Surgeon General hopes to curb the epidemic of opioid abuse in America in a meaningful way by providing the public with information to protect themselves and their families and shifting the way we view addiction through on-site visits with staff and patients. During his recent visit to Knoxville, U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy met with local provider Behavioral Health Group (BHG) in an effort to further understand the status of treatment services in an area afflicted with some of the highest per-capita rates of opiate addiction in America.

The U.S. Surgeon General first toured the Ailor Intake Center, where he had an opportunity to engage with the staff charged with discerning between a patient who is appropriate for treatment, and one who may need a different level of care. Derek Walsh, Regional Vice President with BHG, elaborated on the entry requirements – “In order to be considered appropriate for treatment, a patient must meet stringent Federal and State requirements, in addition to our assessment of their medical condition and overall stability.” The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services estimates that approximately 70,000 Tennesseans may qualify for outpatient treatment for opiate addiction.

In touring BHG’s Knoxville Citico Treatment Center Medication Room, Nursing Supervisor Haley Green described for the U.S. Surgeon General the practice of perpetually assessing the patient to ensure medical stability: “Every interaction we have with the patient is an opportunity for us to assess the appropriateness of his/her medical care.” Ensuring that each patient is medically stabilized at the lowest possible dose of either methadone or buprenorphine is a critical component of BHG’s focus on safe and effective treatment.

Fielding questions from local media, the U.S. Surgeon General highlighted the need for expanded access to care, and how critical provider education is to ensure that this epidemic can be curtailed. “Addiction is a chronic illness….not a moral failing or a character flaw,” Murthy said. “We have to shift how we think about addiction, because until we do that, it’s going to be hard for us to, ultimately, get treatment for those who need it.”

BHG Regional Vice President Jeremy Wilkerson echoed the Surgeon General’s remarks to local media – “BHG is delivering high quality medical care in the form of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), which is the industry recognized “Gold Standard” for the treatment of this disease.”

About Behavioral Health Group

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading provider of opioid addiction treatment services. BHG utilizes pharmacotherapy (maintenance and detoxification) and behavioral therapy (counseling) to treat both the bio-chemical and psychosocial aspects of addiction. In doing so, BHG offers patients their best opportunity for a successful recovery. With 38 outpatient treatment centers across the Midwest/South/Southeast, BHG provides a critical service to thousands of individuals and their communities across the country. BHG treatment centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

For media inquiries, contact:
Derek Walsh
214-365-6133

For prospective patients, contact:
BHG Intake Call Center
214-365-6146
www.bhgrecovery.com

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/us-surgeon-general-visits-behavioral-health-group-knoxville-treatment-center-300288965.html

To view the article on Yahoo Finance, visit: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/u-surgeon-general-visits-behavioral-210100272.html

Behavioral Health Group, LLC Acquires Two Opioid Treatment Programs in South Carolina

Today, Behavioral Health Group, LLC (BHG) announced the acquisition of two addiction treatment programs in Spartanburg and Aiken, South Carolina.

“We are pleased to welcome our new South Carolina colleagues and patients to BHG,” said Jay Higham, Chief Executive Officer of BHG.  “We look to this type of strategic acquisition as a continuation of steps in building BHG relationships with the communities that we serve, while meeting our overall growth plans. South Carolina represents a new market for the Company and complements our acquisitions in North Carolina in August of 2015.”

“A fundamental component of BHG’s strategy when we make an acquisition is to upgrade the infrastructure by bringing modern technology, employee benefits and additional capacity,” said Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer of BHG.  “As these investments are made, patients benefit by receiving individualized treatment including appropriate medication and counseling.”

Brent Brady, owner of the Spartanburg and Aiken treatment centers and a pharmacist, is happy that BHG will continue his philosophy of helping patients with opioid addiction.  “As I began discussions with BHG it was obvious that we share a passion and concern for patients.  BHG’s mission of providing the best evidenced-based treatment for opioid addiction is as important to me as the details of the transaction, which were fair and transparent to me as the owner.”

BHG’s entry into the Carolinas through the acquisition of four treatment centers represents a commitment to expanding in southeastern US markets through additional acquisitions of opioid treatment programs as well as targeted new treatment center openings in the future.

BHG to acquire North Carolina Treatment Centers

Jay Higham, Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Chief Executive Officer, has announced the acquisition of two opioid treatment programs (OTPs) in North Carolina, located in Asheville and Clyde.

“We are delighted to welcome our North Carolina colleagues and patients to the BHG experience of care,” Higham said. “Additionally, we look to this type of strategic acquisition as a logical next step in building the BHG network, while maintaining excellent patient care.”

Dick Trotman, former owner of and new Executive Director for the North Carolina Market, said, “The North Carolina Team is pleased to join the BHG family. We are excited to leverage their systems and industry position to continue to deliver the best quality care possible.”

The facilities will undergo a number of infrastructure and information technology upgrades over the coming weeks. Derek Walsh, Vice President of Operations Administration, is charged with developing and implementing the acquisition plan – “Over the coming weeks, we will be working with Mr. Trotman and his staff to integrate their facilities into the BHG Network.”

Dwight Mussleman, Chief Development Officer, is eager to see BHG expand into a new market – “There are copious amounts of patients to be served in North Carolina and specifically the Asheville metropolitan area. We are proud to add facilities with a strong reputation for quality.”

View the original article here.

Behavioral Health Group Continues to Expand in Colorado

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) today announced their recent acquisition of Comprehensive Addiction Treatment Services in Denver, Colorado. In conjunction, BHG has relocated and merged their Denver Treatment Center to 2222 E. 18th Avenue, Suite C, Denver, CO 80206.

Denver, CO – “This merger and acquisition helps improve the resources available in order to provide “best-in-class” treatment to the patients in Colorado. BHG will continue to make significant investments in the Denver market in order to continue its mission of producing superior patient outcomes,” said Dwight Mussleman, BHG Chief Development Officer.

Jay Higham, BHG Chief Executive Officer, added, “Quality care is our top priority and every contact we have with a patient should leave that person with a sense of Hope, Respect, and Caring. This acquisition allows for BHG to continuously help meet the needs of patients in the Denver area as an addition to our other locations in Longmont and Westminster, Colorado.”

View the original article here.

BHG Receives Approved Education Provider Status

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) receives Approved Education Provider Status

Dallas, Texas – September ##, 2013Michael Cannizzaro, Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, announced that BHG has received authorization from NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals, to grant continuing education credits for its learning and development programs to its licensed drug abuse counselors. The NAADAC Approved Education Provider program highlights BHG’s commitment to quality education and dedication to excellence.

 

The NAADAC Approved Education Provider status identifies BHG’s internal learning and development programs as meeting stringent, nationally approved standards of education developed for the drug abuse counseling field. “As a private provider of opioid addiction treatment services, this authorization as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider represents a significant effort by our Learning and Development department to provide high-quality, relevant, and applicable training programs for our staff; and demonstrates our commitment to drive continuous improvement in all we do,” added James Draudt, BHG President and Chief Operating Officer.

 

Chance Spiker, BHG’s Director of Learning and Development, said, “We strive to ensure that our professional staff of licensed addiction counselors are provided consistent, reliable and quality learning experiences that will benefit not only our internal team members, but the patients and communities we serve. This authorization from NAADAC ensures that the continuing education credits provided by BHG to its team members will be accepted toward national credentialing by the National Certification Commission for Addiction Professionals as well as many individual state licensing/credentialing bodies. This is a significant accomplishment for BHG and we are proud to be recognized by NAADAC for our efforts.”

 

BHG expects to begin providing continuing education hours to its team members beginning in October.

 

About Behavioral Health Group

 

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading provider of opioid addiction treatment services. BHG utilizes pharmacotherapy (maintenance and detoxification) as well as counseling to treat both the bio-chemical and psychosocial aspects of addiction. In doing so, BHG offers patients their best opportunity for a successful recovery. With 30 outpatient treatment centers across the Midwest/South/Southeast, BHG provides a critical service to thousands of individuals and their communities across the country. BHG treatment centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

 

For more information, phone 214-365-6100, email inquiries@bhgrecovery.com or visit www.bhgrecovery.com.

 

Media Contact: Deborah G. Fliehman 847-276-2808 ext. 224. DebbieF@Creativetechresources.com

BHG Acquires Opioid Treatment Program in Fort Collins, Colorado

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Acquires Opioid Treatment Program (OTP) in Fort Collins, Colorado

Dallas, Texas – October 8, 2013 – Michael Cannizzaro, Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, announced the acquisition of North Colorado Behavioral Health, an opioid treatment program (OTP) located in Fort Collins, Colorado. Mr. Cannizzaro said, “We are pleased to welcome the Fort Collins staff and patients to the BHG experience of care. This strategic acquisition demonstrates our commitment to continually build relationships with the communities that we serve, while meeting our overall growth plans to serve individuals suffering from opioid addiction.”

 

Dwight Mussleman, BHG Chief Development Officer, said, “BHG now owns and operates three treatment centers in Northern Colorado. The addition of Fort Collins brings the total number of facilities in our Company network of opioid treatment programs to 31. James Draudt, BHG President and Chief Operating Officer, added, “There are numerous patients to be served throughout Northern Colorado. We are proud to add this program to our Colorado presence that currently includes centers in Denver and Boulder.”

 

About Behavioral Health Group

 

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading provider of opioid addiction treatment services. BHG utilizes pharmacotherapy (maintenance and detoxification) as well as counseling to treat both the bio-­‐chemical and psychosocial aspects of addiction. In doing so, BHG offers patients their best opportunity for a successful recovery. With 31 outpatient treatment centers across the Midwest/South/Southeast/West, BHG provides a critical service to thousands of individuals and their communities across the country. BHG treatment centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

 

For more information, phone 214-­‐365-­‐6100, email inquiries@bhgrecovery.com or visit www.bhgrecovery.com.

 

Media Contact: Deborah G. Fliehman 847-­‐276-­‐2808 ext. 224. DebbieF@Creativetechresources.com

BHG New Medication Option

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Outpatient Opioid Treatment Centers Offer New Medication Option for Patients

DALLAS, May 8, 2013 — /PRNewswire/ — Michael Cannizzaro, Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, announced that BHG treatment centers are now offering both Buprenorphine and Methadone in their medication-assisted treatment programs.

 

Mr. Cannizzaro said, “BHG’s outpatient opioid addiction treatment centers address each patient’s physical opioid addiction with either Methadone or Buprenorphine medications in combination with counseling and skill development. This expanded service offering demonstrates our commitment to helping each individual patient achieve his/her best functional level in the community.”

 

Kelly Clark, MD, BHG Chief Medical Officer, commented, “Since most patients will be clinically appropriate for either Buprenorphine or Methadone medication, the choice of which medication each patient will try will usually be decided by the patient in consultation with his/her physician. Most patients will do well on either medication, while a few will only do well on one or the other. This additional medication option offers a choice for patients, especially those with medical conditions.”

 

BHG’s mission is to achieve positive patient outcomes by using medication-assisted treatment at the lowest possible medication dosage combined with behavioral therapy to control medical and behavioral signs of opioid addiction within an outpatient setting.

 

About Behavioral Health Group

 

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading provider of opioid addiction treatment services. BHG utilizes pharmacotherapy (maintenance and detoxification) as well as counseling to treat both the bio-chemical and psychosocial aspects of addiction. In doing so, BHG offers patients their best opportunity for a successful recovery. With 29 outpatient treatment centers across the Midwest/South/Southeast, BHG provides a critical service to thousands of individuals and their communities across the country. BHG treatment centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

 

For more information, phone 214-365-6187, email inquiries@bhgrecovery.com or visit www.bhgrecovery.com.

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Acquires Three Opioid Treatment Programs in Eastern Kentucky

DALLAS, Jan. 8, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Michael Cannizzaro, Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Chairman and Chief Executive Officer announced the acquisition of three opioid treatment programs (OTPs) in Eastern Kentucky located in Hazard, Paintsville, and Pikeville.

Mr. Cannizzaro said, “We are pleased to welcome our new Kentucky colleagues and patients to the BHG experience of care.  Additionally, we look to this type of strategic acquisition as a continuation of steps in building BHG relationships with the communities that we serve, while meeting our overall growth plans.”

Lori A. Nation, MD, former owner and partner of the three Kentucky OTPs, said, “I am pleased to join BHG as the Medical Director for the three programs.  The acquisition process with BHG was straightforward and it has been a pleasure working with the BHG leadership team.”

“We are pleased that Dr. Nation has joined our BHG family, and we look forward to her continuing her important work as we expand our presence into the state of Kentucky,” said Dwight Mussleman, BHG Chief Development Officer.  With the addition of Kentucky, BHG now serves patients and communities in eight (8) states.

Jim Draudt, BHG Chief Operating Officer, said, “Over the coming weeks, we will be working with Dr. Nation and each center’s staff to integrate their programs into the BHG network of treatment facilities.”

View the original article here.

BHG CMO Announcement

Behavioral Health Group Announces Appointment of Kelly Clark, MD, MBA as Chief Medical Officer

DALLAS, TX, July 25, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — The Board of Directors of Behavioral Health Group (“BHG” or “the Company”) today announced the appointment of Kelly J. Clark, MD, MBA, as Chief Medical Officer. Dr. Clark joined BHG July 9, 2012.

 

Dr. Clark joins BHG with a wide breadth and depth of both clinical and administrative experience. She has practiced addiction medicine and psychiatry throughout the continuum of care, and taught addiction treatment as a faculty member of the University of Massachusetts. She comes to BHG having most recently worked to integrate medical and behavioral health care management as Medical Director at CDPHP. She serves as President of the Kentucky Society of Addiction Medicine, where she has practiced medicine for several years and served as Medical Director of a number of Opioid Treatment Programs.

 

“I am thrilled to join BHG in the work of providing excellent treatment services to those patients suffering under the epidemic of opioid addiction,” said Clark. “This disease is ravaging individual lives and entire communities across the country. BHG is uniquely situated to bring best practice medication assisted treatment to thousands of patients, and I am excited to work to increase access to evidence-based, physician-directed, team-delivered, high-quality care”.

 

A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Kelly holds a Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Wisconsin, and a Master of Business Administration with Additional Certification in Health Sector Management from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. She is currently on the faculty of the Virginia Tech Carillion School of Medicine. Dr. Clark is a Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, where she serves as a Director, and is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association.

 

BHG’s Chairman and CEO, Michael N. Cannizzaro, said of the appointment: “The Board is delighted to welcome Kelly to BHG’s executive team as Chief Medical Officer. Her talents and experiences will be invaluable in directing the pharmacotherapy and behavioral therapy aspect of our business as she builds the Medical Directorate of our company.”

 

About Behavioral Health Group

 

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading provider of opioid addiction treatment services. BHG utilizes pharmacotherapy (maintenance and detoxification) and behavioral therapy (counseling) to treat both the bio-chemical and psycho-social aspects of addiction. In doing so, BHG offers its patients their best shot at successful recovery. With 23 outpatient treatment centers across the midwest/south/southeast, BHG provides a critical service to thousands of individuals and their communities across the country. BHG’s treatment centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

 

For more information, call (214) 365-6100, email inquiries@bhgrecovery.com, or visit https://bhgrecovery.com.

 

Behavioral Health Group Contact: James F. Draudt, COO

BHG CEO Announcement

Behavioral Health Group Announces Transition of CEO Andrew Love to Advisory Role; Board Appoints Chairman, Mike Cannizzaro, as Chairman and CEO

DALLAS, TX, July 25, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — The Board of Directors of Behavioral Health Group (“BHG” or “the Company”) today announced that Andrew Love has stepped down as Chief Executive Officer and Director and has transitioned to a consulting role with the Company as he pursues a new opportunity. He is succeeded by Michael N. Cannizzaro, BHG’s Chairman.

 

Andy said of his transition: “It was an honor to build and lead BHG from inception to its sale a year ago to the Frontenac Company. I am delighted to continue working together with the leadership team of professionals at BHG and Frontenac, and I am grateful for the support I’ve received from the Board of Directors and our team members over the last six years as we have built BHG into a leader in the field of opioid addiction treatment.”

 

Mr. Love added, “BHG’s growth will undoubtedly accelerate under the outstanding and experienced leadership of Mike Cannizzaro, with whom I have enjoyed working over the last year. I look forward to my continued support of BHG as a co-founder, advisor, and shareholder.”

 

BHG’s Chairman and CEO, Mike Cannizzaro, said: “The Board expresses its gratitude to Andy for his dedicated service to BHG since co-founding the company in 2006, and we thank him for the vision and leadership he brought to the company. We are delighted that we will be able to draw on Andy’s talents and experience through his participation as an advisor to the Company. We wish him every success in his future endeavors.”

 

Mike Cannizzaro, Chairman and CEO, has 36 years of leadership experience in healthcare companies, including Baxter Healthcare, Caremark International, Beltone Electronics, National Nephrology, and Sunrise Medical, to name a few. He was also an operating partner of JW Childs Associates, a leading private equity firm based in Boston.

 

About Behavioral Health Group

 

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading provider of opioid addiction treatment services. BHG utilizes pharmacotherapy (maintenance and detoxification) and behavioral therapy (counseling) to treat both the bio-chemical and psycho-social aspects of addiction. In doing so, BHG offers its patients their best shot at successful recovery. With 23 outpatient treatment centers across the midwest/south/southeast, BHG provides a critical service to thousands of individuals and their communities across the country. BHG’s treatment centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

 

For more information, call (214) 365-6100, email inquiries@bhgrecovery.com, or visit https://bhgrecovery.com.

 

Behavioral Health Group Contact: James F. Draudt

BHG Tennessee Announcement

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Acquires Opioid Treatment Program in Tennessee

Dallas, Texas – May 7, 2013 – Michael Cannizzaro, Behavioral Health Group (BHG) Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, announced the acquisition of an opioid treatment program (OTP) in Central Tennessee located in Columbia. “We are pleased to welcome the Columbia staff and patients to the BHG experience of care. This strategic acquisition demonstrates our commitment to continually build relationships with the communities that we serve, while meeting our overall growth plans to serve individuals suffering from opioid addiction.”

 

Dwight Mussleman, BHG Chief Development Officer, said, “There are numerous patients to be served throughout Central Tennessee. We are proud to add this program to our Tennessee presence that currently includes centers in Jackson, Knoxville, Memphis, Nashville and Paris.”

 

Denise Woodie, Program Director, said, “Our treatment center staff is excited to be a part of the BHG family. We have enjoyed working with the BHG executive team through this transition and found this integration process to be smooth and uncomplicated. Becoming part of the BHG network of treatment centers allows us to leverage both the organization’s resources and knowledge to deliver excellent patient care and enhanced support to ensure that our patients progress efficiently through their recovery process.”

 

About Behavioral Health Group

 

Behavioral Health Group (BHG) is a leading provider of opioid addiction treatment services. BHG utilizes pharmacotherapy (maintenance and detoxification) as well as counseling to treat both the bio-chemical and psychosocial aspects of addiction. In doing so, BHG offers patients their best opportunity for a successful recovery. With 29 outpatient treatment centers across the Midwest/South/Southeast, BHG provides a critical service to thousands of individuals and their communities across the country. BHG treatment centers are accredited by The Joint Commission.

 

For more information, phone 214-365-6100, email inquiries@bhgrecovery.com or visit www.bhgrecovery.com.

 

Media Contact: Deborah G. Fliehman 847-276-2808 ext. 224. DebbieF@Creativetechresources.com